creep

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creep

 [krēp]
1. a physical property of materials that results in progressive deformation when a constant load is applied over time; it allows soft tissues to tolerate applied loads by lengthening.
2. to move along the ground using the arms and legs for propulsion. The trunk does not touch the ground.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

creep

(krēp),
Any time-dependent strain developing in a material or an object in response to the application of a force or stress.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Cosmetic surgery A phenomenon that occurs in scalp reduction surgery after excision of a large area of alopecia, in which the skin slowly expands in response to a continuous force—e.g., the suture line at the point of closure
Managed care DRG creep
Materials science Cold flow A time-dependent strain or deformation of a material in response to a continuous force or constant stress; creep is of interest to orthopaedists who place prosthetic devices in weight-bearing regions—e.g., polyethylene components of artificial joints
Physiology A slow, continued lengthening of a muscle following a first phase of muscle lengthening
Vox populi A ne’er do well
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

creep

(krēp, krēp)
Progressive deformation of a material due to exposure to constant load over an extended period.
[M.E. crepen, fr. A.S. crēopan]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

creep

(krēp)
Any time-dependent strain developing in a material or an object in response to the application of a force or stress.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Back when I shot a single-cam bow, I had problems with the creep test, because I couldn't find an easy way to adjust highs and lows out of the system.
The figures in question reveal that the creep course followed by 15% OSA-added concretes was partly similar to that of 0% OSA-added (OPC-control) specimens.
If the penetration depth of moisture throughout the cross section had influenced the creep then it would have taken much longer time to reach stabilization of the mechanosorptive creep.
If the above arguments are reasonable, then it is suggested that the creep rate in a grain of a polycrystalline aggregate can be represented by summation of the viscous glide and climb rates as follows [13]:
Freezing and rethawing of the preparations did not change the shape of the creep curves or the creep rates.
The need for control of additional elements in Grade 91 steel is directly linked to the susceptibility for nucleation of creep voids and the associated reduction in the creep ductility [26].
To overcome these limitations of the conventional continuum method, we use the lattice approach to model the creep fracture in this paper.
The true rigidity of the material is not significantly affected; the creep or apparent modulus is a mathematical construct for expressing the relationship between a constant stress and an ever-increasing strain.
Based on creep experiments, the creep constitutive models are usually proposed to study the time-dependent behavior of rock.
The creep prediction study showed that the polycarbonate resin had a projected lifetime of 3.9 years under the indicated application conditions, including use at 23[degrees]C under continuous loading at 6,400 psi (44 MPa).
The Burger's model divides the creep strain of a polymer material into three parts: (1) instantaneous deformation (Maxwell spring), (2) viscoelastic deformation (Kelvin unit), and (3) viscous deformation (Maxwell dashpot).
The investigations provide a substantial insight into the creep behavior of the two regarded polyaddition adhesive families.