bubonic plague

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bu·bon·ic plague

the usual form of plague manifestations of which include inflammatory enlargement of the lymphatic glands in the groin, axillae, or other parts.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bubonic plague

(bo͞o-bŏn′ĭk, byo͞o-)
n.
A form of infectious plague that is characterized by the formation of buboes and is transmitted to humans principally by the bite of a flea that has bitten an infected rodent, usually a rat.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A rare bacterial infection due to Yersinia pestis; in its full-blown fulminant form—explosive Y pestis growth—it may kill in 24 hrs, by destroying normal tissues; after 3 days of incubation, high fever, black blotchy rashes—DIC—plus petechial hemorrhage, delirium; bursting of a bubo—a massively enlarged lymph node—is extremely painful
Epidemiology Y pestis is transmitted by Oriental rat fleas—Xenopsylla cheopis—which bite the rat, ingesting Y pestis; these rapidly reproduce in the flea, forming a ‘plug’ of obstructing bacteria in the flea’s gut, making the flea ravenously hungry and making it go into a feeding frenzy, in which it repeatedly bites the rat and regurgitates Y pestis; once the usual hosts—rats—die, the fleas becomes less discriminating and attack any mammal; in humans, aerosol is the common mode of transmission
Incubation 2–10 days
Mortality Without antibiotics, nearly 100%; with antibiotics, 5%

Medical History The Black Plague of Middle Ages Europe arrived with the Tartars in Sicily in late 1347, reaching Paris by the following winter; within 3–4 years, it had killed 25 million, 30% to 60% of Europe’s population at the time; Yersinia pestis infection of mammalian hosts is attributed to suppression and avoidance of the host’s immune defenses—e.g., phagocytosis and antibody production
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bubonic plague

Black death, black plague Infectious disease A rare bacterial infection due to Yersinia pestis; in its full-blown fulminant form–explosive Y pestis growth–may kill in 24 hrs, by destroying normal tissues; after 3 days of incubation, high fever, black blotchy rashes–DIC plus petechial hemorrhage, delirium; bursting of a bubo–a massively enlarged lymph node–is painful enough to 'raise the dead' Clinical Painful, enlarged lymph nodes, fever, headache, prostration, pneumonia, sepsis Epidemiology Y pestis is transmitted by Oriental rat fleas–Xenopsylla cheopis, which bite the rat, ingesting Y pestis; these rapidly reproduce in the flea, forming a 'plug' of obstructing bacteria in the flea's gut, making the flea ravenously hungry, which goes into a feeding frenzy, repeatingly biting the rat and regurgitating Y pestis; once the usual hosts–rats–die, the fleas becomes less discriminating and attack any mammal; in humans, aerosol is the common mode of transmission Incubation 2-10 days Mortality Without antibiotics, nearly 100%; with antibiotics, 5%. See Yersinia pestis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bu·bon·ic plague

(bū-bon'ik plāg)
The most common form of plague characterized by fever, cutaneous and visceral hemorrhages, and buboes (inflammatory enlargements of lymph nodes draining the bites of infected fleas). Clinical manifestations are caused by the flea-transmitted Yersinia pestis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bubonic plague

A highly infectious disease caused by the organism Yersinia pestis, spread by rat fleas. There is high fever, severe headache, pain and swelling in the groin, severe TOXAEMIA and mental confusion. Antibiotics are effective.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

bubonic plague

see BLACK DEATH.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
How did the patient get the bubonic plague? "This was a patient who had very, very poor hygiene in the house, and there were dead rodents and fleas," he explained.
Some students may think that the bubonic plague was the only cause of the Black Death.
Her specific theme is the bubonic plague, arriving in Europe in 1347 but remaining a threat until 1890.
A century later, the village, then called Poultney, was "lost" as the bubonic plague swept Britain and Europe.
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The bubonic plague that is still found in this day and age in India and the Southwestern United States is carried by rat fleas, while ticks carrying Lyme disease can also be found on rats, albeit more in the suburban areas of the metropolitan area than in the concrete jungle.
The bubonic plague (or the Black Death as it was called) marched inexorably westward.
A Distant Mirror (1978), which began as a study of the bubonic plague in Europe, became an exhaustive account of France in the 14th century.
His research focused on the bubonic plague, which was the subject of a fatwa by Saudi cleric Nasir al-Fahd, who said the Prophet would be happy if the plague could be unleashed to wipe out Europe.
Suffering in paradise; the bubonic plague in English literature from More to Milton.