genesis

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genesis

 [jen´ĕ-sis]
creation; origination; used as a word termination joined to an element indicating the thing created, e.g., carcinogenesis.

gen·e·sis

(jen'ĕ-sis),
An origin or beginning process; also used as combining form in suffix position.
[G.]

genesis

/gen·e·sis/ (jen´ĕ-sis) [Gr.] creation; origination.

genesis

[jen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, origin
1 the origin, generation, or developmental evolution of anything.
2 the act of producing or procreating.

genesis

The beginning of a process

gen·e·sis

(jen'ĕ-sis)
An origin or beginning process; also used as combining form in suffix position.
[G.]

genesis

Origins, beginnings or the process of being formed.

genesis

creation; origination; used as a word termination joined to an element indicating the thing created, e.g. carcinogenesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
That view of the matter is a bit harsh, as later in the Book of Genesis Esau shows he isn't wicked.
From the look of awe on the faces of Adam and Eve as God shows them the Garden of Eden for the first time to the relieved countenance of Israel as he gazes into his son Joseph's face after a long separation, Crumb turns the ancient figures of the Book of Genesis into real, breathing human beings.
It has reportedly taken four years for Crumb to reinterpret the Book of Genesis, working from the King James Bible and Robert Alter's translation.
The practice of placing ash in the shape of a cross on the forehead stems from the biblical the Book of Genesis, where God castigates Adam and Eve.
The book of Genesis continues to fascinate believers and nonbelievers alike.
Traditional "young-earth" creationists insist that the earth is only 6,000 years old, basing this on their reading of the Book of Genesis.
For instance, he writes as though Thrasymachus thinks like Marx, Socrates like Calvin, and as if Book VIII's cycle of regimes calls to mind Luke's Gospel and the Book of Genesis.
If that is in reference to Adam in the Book of Genesis, Chapter 2, verse 17, "But of the tree of knowledge of good and evil thou shalt not eat of it"--the scripture doesn't say apple.
The core of and impetus for Goldenberg's deeply and massively researched book is that strange (and, as it turned out, portentous) entry in the Book of Genesis (Gen 9: 18-25) which describes how Noah and his three sons, Shem, Ham and Japheth, finally disembarked from the ark and were instructed to people the earth; how Noah raised grapes and made wine, and how he drank the wine and became drunk and passed out, how his three sons found him naked, but only Ham (the youngest son) peeked at the old man's nudity.
The book also includes in appendixes an analysis of the chronology of several texts of Luther and Melanchthon on the book of Genesis from 1518-1545, a convincing critique of Peter Meinhold's conclusions regarding the textual reliability of the lectures (compiled from lecture notes by Luther's students and published in four volumes from 1544-1554), and a bibliography of 16th-century Genesis commentaries.
It begins in the Book of Genesis with the marriage of Adam and Eve, and it ends in the Book of Revelation with the 'wedding of the Lamb'--the marriage of Christ and the Church.
Snyder heard hours of testimony that included references to 100-year-old court cases and passages from the book of Genesis.