Belmont report

(redirected from The Belmont Principles)

Belmont report

A national commission that promulgated the basic ethical guidelines and principles for human research in the U.S.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another thorny question is how to extend the protections of the individual that were codified in the Belmont principles to the community.
Are the Belmont principles adequate to address the new facets of research that are entailed in community-engaged research?
To guide such an adaptation, I introduce three research methodologies (1)--decolonizing, participatory, and feminist--that specialize in work with underserved populations, as these approaches have a tradition of modifying the Belmont principles for community work.
However, several research ethics scholars have suggested that the Belmont principles are ill-suited to community-based research, especially as the concepts are currently applied by Institutional Review Boards (Brydon-Miller & Greenwood, 2006; Shore, 2007; Tuhiwai Smith, 1999).
Together, these three research methodologies can help us adapt the Belmont principles to ensure the ethical practice of service-learning.
Yet respecting community partners, in the fuller sense of the word, lays the groundwork for a deeper application of all of the Belmont principles.
Together, the aforementioned adaptation of the Belmont principles, along with reflexivity, comprise a proposed set of ethical guidelines for service-learning.
In essence, the discernment of justice in human research leads one back flail circle to the Belmont principles of respect for persons and beneficence.
Like all three of the Belmont Principles, it is a process with a pervading and even disturbing energy.
Now leading the investigation against a backdrop of tremendous political interest - including the Belmont principles, among them the developers, led by Kajima Urban Development, and the district's law firm at the time, O'Melveny & Myers - Cooley said he is concerned only with the facts.
It is also well known that the Belmont principles were created at the urging of the state, and enacted as regulations, with the help of Kennedy Institute members who were simultaneously writing Principles of Biomedical Ethics.
While the Belmont principles were created simultaneously with Beauchamp and Childress's textbook, it seems clear that the textbook would not have had the influence it did if it had not articulated what would soon become the legally mandated system in human research.