retained surgical sponge

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retained surgical sponge

A term of art referring to an intraoperative mistake discovered postoperatively, in which one or more surgical sponges, gauze pads or other form of textile is left behind in the operative field after closing the patient. Retained surgical sponges may become a nidus for infection, and are often grounds for malpractice lawsuits.
References in periodicals archive ?
First reported by Wilson in 1884,5 gossypiboma has various synonyms such as "textiloma", "gauzoma", or "muslinoma.".
The term gossypiboma (textiloma, cottonoid, gauzoma, and muslinoma) is used to describe the development of a mass around forgotten surgical materials, such as gauze pads or compresses.
Alper, "Obstructive jaundice due to a textiloma mimicking a common bile duct stone," Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, vol.
We defined reoperative thyroidectomy as any surgery on the thyroid bed that required a return to the operating room for reoperation either to complete the first surgery (lobectomy, completion thyroidectomy, or lymph node dissection of the central compartment) or in relation to a complication related to the first surgery (haemorrhage, textiloma, infection, etc.) and whatever the time between the two interventions.
They are known as textiloma or gossypiboma and occur with various surgical procedures including abdominal surgery.
Gossypiboma (textiloma, gauzeoma, muslinoma, cottonbaloma, cottonoid) is the term used to describe a retained "mass of cotton".
El gossypiboma, tambien conocido como textiloma o gasoma es un termino usado para describir una masa dentro del organismo generada por material quirurgico olvidado acompanada de una reaccion tisular a un cuerpo extrano.
Ya visto en el servicio de Anatomopatologia, el aparente residual tumoral resulto ser un "cuerpo extrano, textiloma, fragmento de gasa (gasas)".
The term 'gossypiboma (or textiloma) is derived from gossypium (Latin) meaning cotton, and boma, a Swahili word denoting a place of concealment.
Textiloma and gossypiboma are non-medical terms used to describe a mass of cotton matrix that is left behind in a body cavity during an operation1.
Gossypiboma (which is also known as textiloma, cottonoid, and gauzeoma) is a mass formed by a retained surgical sponge surrounded by encapsulating reactive tissue.1 It was first described in 1884 by Wilson.2 The term is derived from the Latin word gossypium, meaning "cotton," and the Kiswahili word boma, which means "place of concealment." 3 It is not possible to precisely determine the true incidence of gossypiboma because of legal and medical concerns that lead to underreporting of cases and because some patients remain asymptomatic for years.4 However, the incidence has been reported as 1 in 100 to 3000 for all surgical interventions and 1 in 1000 to 1500 for abdominal surgery.
Gossypiboma or textiloma is used to describe a retained surgical sponge as a heritage of previous surgery, causing medico-legal issues.