tetracycline

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Related to Tetracyclins: Tetracycline antibiotics

tetracycline

 [tet″rah-si´klēn]
1. any of a group of related broad-spectrum antibiotics; some are isolated from certain species of Streptomyces and others are produced semisynthetically. The group includes chlortetracycline, demeclocycline, doxycycline, minocycline, oxytetracycline, and tetracycline (def. 2). Tetracyclines are effective against a wide range of aerobic and anaerobic gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and are used particularly for rickettsiae, mycoplasmas, and chlamydiae; they are also effective against certain protozoa.
2. a semisynthetic antibiotic having the same wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity as other members of the tetracycline group; administered orally. The hydrochloride salt has similar actions and is administered orally, intramuscularly, intravenously, or topically to the skin or conjunctiva.

tet·ra·cy·cline

(tet-ră-sī'klēn, -klin),
A broad spectrum antibiotic (a naphthacene derivative), the parent of oxytetracycline, prepared from chlortetracycline and also obtained from the culture filtrate of several species of Streptomyces; also available as tetracycline hydrochloride and tetracycline phosphate complex. Tetracycline fluorescence has been used in studies of growing tumors and calcium deposition in developing bone and teeth.

tetracycline

/tet·ra·cy·cline/ (-si´klēn)
1. any of a group of related broad-spectrum antibiotics, isolated from species of Streptomyces or produced semisynthetically.
2. a semisynthetic antibiotic produced semisynthetically from chlortetracycline, having the same wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity as other members of the tetracycline group; used as the base or the hydrochloride salt.

tetracycline

(tĕt′rə-sī′klēn′, -klĭn)
n.
1. A yellow crystalline compound, C22H24N2O8, synthesized or derived from certain microorganisms of the genus Streptomyces and used as a broad-spectrum antibiotic.
2. An antibiotic, such as chlortetracycline and oxytetracycline, having the same basic structure.

tetracycline

Tet Dermatology An antibiotic widely used for acne vulgaris Infectious disease Tetracycline is used to manage Rickettsiae–RMSF, typhus fever, typhus group, Q fever, rickettsialpox, tick fevers, Mycoplasma pneumonia e, Chlamydia–psittacosis/ornithosis, LGV, granuloma inguinale; Borrelia recurrentis–relapsing fever; gram-negative bugs–Haemophilus ducreyi–chancroid agent, Pasteurella pestis, P tularensis, Bartonella bacilliformis, Bacteroides spp, Vibrio comma, V fetus, Brucella spp Adverse effects GI–anorexia, epigastric distress, N&V, diarrhea, bulky loose stools, stomatitis, sore throat, glossitis, black hairy tongue, dysphagia, hoarseness, enterocolitis, anogenital lesions with monilial overgrowth Molecular biology A broad-spectrum bacteriostatic that inhibits protein synthesis by preventing aminoacyl tRNA from binding to ribosomes. See Tetracycline labeling.

tetracycline

One of a group of antibiotic drugs originally derived from Streptomyces species. They are used to treat a wide range of infections including RICKETTSIAL DISEASES, CHOLERA, BRUCELLOSIS, LYME DISEASE and most of the SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES. They have the disadvantage that they are deposited in bones and teeth and will cause permanent yellow staining of the latter if given to young children. They will similarly affect fetuses if given to women in late pregnancy. The tetracyclines have a useful effect on ACNE and ROSACEA. This does not imply that acne is an infection. Tetracyclines are effective in acne because non-pathogenic bacteria present in the sebum in acne produce enzymes that separate fatty acids from the fats and these acids cause inflammation. Tetracyclines are concentrated in sebum, while penicillins are not. Tetracyclines are on the WHO official drug list. Brand names are Achromycin, Deteclo and, for external use, Topicycline.

tetracycline

an ANTIBIOTIC of the broad spectrum type, so called because of its effect on a wide variety of bacteria including both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria (see GRAM'S STAIN). Tetracycline inhibits bacterial PROTEIN SYNTHESIS. Various tetracyclines are produced by STREPTOMYCES species, including clinically important ones such as aureomycin and terramycin.

antibiotic 

1. Pertaining to the ability to destroy or inhibit other living organisms.
2. A substance derived from a mould or bacterium, or produced synthetically, that destroys (bactericidal) or inhibits the growth (bacteriostatic) of other microorganisms and is thus used to treat infections. Some substances have a narrow spectrum of activity whereas others act against a wide range of both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms (broad-spectrum antibiotics). Antibiotics can be classified into several groups according to their mode of action on or within bacteria: (1) Drugs inhibiting bacterial cell wall synthesis, such as bacitracin, vancomycin and the β-lactams based agents (e.g. penicillin, cephalosporins (e.g. ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime). (2) Drugs affecting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, such as polymyxin B sulfate and gramicidin. (3) Drugs inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis, such as aminoglycosides (e.g. amikacin sulfate, framycetin sulfate, gentamicin, neomycin sulfate and tobramycin), tetracyclines, macrolides (e.g. erythromycin and azithromycin) and chloramphenicol. (4) Drugs inhibiting the intermediate metabolism of bacteria, such as sulfonamides (e.g. sulfacetamide sodium) and trimethoprim. (5) Drugs inhibiting bacterial DNA synthesis, such as nalixidic acid and fluoroquinolones (e.g. ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin). (6) Other antibiotics such as fusidic acid, the diamidines, such as propamidine isethionate and dibrompropamidine. Syn. antibacterial. See antiinflammatory drug; fusidic acid.

tet·ra·cy·cline

(tetră-sīklēn, -klin)
Broad-spectrum antibiotic; its fluorescence has been used in studies of growing tumors and calcium deposition in developing bones and teeth.

tetracycline (te´trəsī´klēn),

n an antibiotic produced by certain strains of
Streptomyces. Its administration during tooth formation may lead to intrinsic stain due to enamel discoloration that appears as brown to yellow horizontal lines.
tetracycline HCl,
n brand names: Achromycin, Achromycin V, Tetracyn;
drug class: tetracycline, broad-spectrum antibiotic;
action: inhibits protein synthesis and phosphorylation in microorganisms, bacteriostatic;
uses: syphilis, gonorrhea, lymphogranuloma venereum, rickettsial infections, acne, actinomycosis, anthrax, bronchitis, GU infections, sinusitis and many other infections.
tetracycline periodontal fiber,
n brand name: Actisite;
drug class: tetracycline, broad-spectrum antiinfective;
action: antimicrobial effect related to inhibition of protein synthesis; decreases incidence of postsurgical inflammation and edema; suppresses bacteria and acts as a barrier to bacterial entry; acts on cementum or fibroblasts to enhance periodontal ligament regeneration;
use: adjunctive treatment in adult periodontitis.

tetracycline

an antibiotic produced by cultures of Streptomyces aureofaciens and S. rimosus. It is effective against many different microorganisms, including rickettsiae, certain viruses, and both gram-negative and gram-positive microorganisms. Preparations include chlortetracycline hydrochloride (Aureomycin), oxytetracycline hydrochloride (Terramycin), tetracycline hydrochloride (Achromycin), and demethylchlortetracycline (Declomycin). Administration of these compounds is associated with pigmentation of developing teeth and bones, and in horses with a severe colitis.

tetracycline stain
discoloration of dentine and enamel caused by systemic treatment with tetracycline during dental development; usually yellow to brown or green to gray.