Tethys Sea

Tethys Sea

the sea that lay between LAURASIA and GONDWANALAND. see CONTINENTAL DRIFT.
References in periodicals archive ?
For both the sandstone that characterizes the monuments of Upper Egypt and the limestone that characterizes those of Lower Egypt were created when the land was repeatedly inundated by an immense body of water -- the Tethys Sea -- of which the Mediterranean Sea of today is but a small remnant.
Caption: Run dry The Tethys Sea initially connected the Indian and Atlantic oceans but shrank as the African and Eurasian continents drifted together, as seen in this simulation.
The modern day remnant of the Tethys Sea is the Mediterranean Sea.
The species of the pupfish genus Aphanius Nardo, 1827 (Cyprinodontiformes) are widely distributed along the late period Tethys Sea coastlines (Smith et al.
If you look up Gondwana, you will see in the Late Triassic an area between Gondwana (South America, Africa, India, Antarctica and Australia) and Laurasia (North America, Europe and Asia) called the Tethys Sea.
Originally they were inhabitant of the sea when the vast Indian subcontinent was submerged under the Tethys sea during the Eocene geological period, but as the land level rose and the sea dried up, the dolphins headed to adapt themselves to the new habitat provided by the turbid waters of the river.
Then the Indian plate started moving northward across the [former body of water called the] Tethys Sea.
In parallel, the ministry has concluded a deal with Maimon's Merhav group--part owner of the EMG company--which would acquire natural gas from Egypt and transport it to the Tethys Sea reserve near Ashkelon.
According to the researcher, Jordan was a part of the Arabian-African continent and much of the land was submerged below the southeastern part of the Tethys Sea, which formed a water barrier between both continents.
Walking With Beasts Whale Killer (BBC1, 8pm) introduces us to Basilosaurus, a carnivorous, 18-metre whale who lived in the Tethys Sea, an ancient waterway connecting Asia to the Atlantic.
Until recently, Wallace's favoured theory was that the waters around Indonesia were a relic of the Tethys Sea, which separated the Asian and Australian continents more than 200 million years ago.