Tethys Sea

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Tethys Sea

the sea that lay between LAURASIA and GONDWANALAND. see CONTINENTAL DRIFT.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the end of the Cretaceous Period when these hadrosaurs lived, the Afro-Arabian continent was separated from the northern continents by the wide Tethys Ocean.
The forerunner of the Indian Ocean, called the Tethys Ocean, shrank around this time as the early African and Eurasian continents drifted together.
Anglesey Aquaculture managing director John Watters felt it was right the question of how the cash was spent should be put to the farm's former owners but said grant money had "no connection" with the current business, acquired by parent company Tethys Ocean (Linnaeus) on January 5 last year.
On January 5 last year, Selonda UK Ltd's assets were acquired by Tethys Ocean, the aquaculture division of Linnaeus.
56% stake, from Linnaeus Capital Partners BV and its subsidiary Tethys Ocean BV for USD6m (EUR4.
Based on field evidences and geochemical and mineralogical data it is suggested that the studied Mn-ores formed due to exhalation of hydrothermal fluid along the mid ocean ridge in the Tethys Ocean where it was precipitated as concordant bodies due to physiochemical changes.
The existence of the Tethys Ocean was first postulated and named (after a goddess of rivers rather than seas) by the geologist Eduard Suess in 1893 as a sea between the supercontinents Gondwana and Angaraland (later called Laurasia).
Either that, he added, or maybe at some point the level of the prehistoric Tethys Ocean that separated southern and northern continents was so low that islands were temporarily connected by land - and animals could basically walk on the sea floor.
There was Tethys Ocean in the South of the valley and it used to have lagoons.
During the Cretaceous Period (145-65 million years ago), the Gondwana super-continent began to split into several continental plates, the Tethys Ocean floor began to subduct beneath the southern margin of Eurasia, and, as the Tethys Ocean became narrower, the Indian Plate moved northward.
The Tethys ocean and the evolving North Atlantic Ocean have only one marine link in the Jurassic-Cretaceous: the seaway around the Iberian plate.
The ancient Tethys Ocean existed between the South American/African and Eurasian supercontinents.