background radiation

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back·ground ra·di·a·tion

irradiation from environmental sources, including the earth's crust, the atmosphere, cosmic rays, and ingested radionuclides.

background radiation

Etymology: AS, baec + OE, grund, ground
naturally occurring radiation emitted by soil, groundwater, building materials, radioactive substances in the body (especially potassium 40), and cosmic rays from outer space. Each year the average person is exposed to 44 millirad (mrad) of external terrestrial radiation, 18 mrad of naturally occurring internal radiation, and 44 mrad of cosmic radiation. Background radiation levels may vary in different locales.

background radiation

The amount of ionising (electromagnetic) radiation to which a person is exposed from natural sources, including terrestrial radiation due to natural radionuclides in the soil (e.g., radon), cosmic radiation and fallout in the environment from anthropogenic sources.

background radiation

Radiation The amount of ionizing-electromagnetic radiation to which a person is exposed from natural sources including terrestrial radiation due to natural radionuclides in the soil–eg, radon, cosmic radiation, and fallout in the environment from anthropogenic sources. See Radon.

back·ground ra·di·a·tion

(bak'grownd rā'dē-ā'shŭn)
Irradiation from environmental sources, including the earth's crust, the atmosphere, cosmic rays, and ingested radionuclides in the body.

back·ground ra·di·a·tion

(bak'grownd rā'dē-ā'shŭn)
Irradiation from environmental sour-ces, including the earth's crust, the atmosphere, cosmic rays, and ingested radionuclides.

background radiation

the inescapable radiation received by the entire population due mostly to cosmic radiation, but also due to naturally occurring radioactive materials in the terrestrial environment and to internal isotopes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Once the requisite organizational grade has been reached in a group, explosive terrestrial radiation can occur independently anywhere that appropriate conditions exist, particularly on newly emergent islands where there will be less competition from existing terrestrial forms.
The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, administered by DOE's Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, WA, focuses on the life cycle of clouds, the movement of solar radiation through the atmosphere, and the re-emission of terrestrial radiation back into space.
System for terrestrial radiation monitoring - 4 pieces - to maintain the ability of terrestrial radiation monitoring using a system sensitive enough to measure the level of radiation from natural background and the transmission of measurement data online in a compatible format to the SONS / SRO.
Terrestrial Radiation Effects in ULSI Devices and Electronic Systems

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