tern

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tern

a large, marine bird in the family Laridae, together with gulls. They are effortless fliers, great divers and poor walkers. Can be infected with avian influenza virus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thanks to the telemetry data from those birds, combined with sightings of banded Tortugas birds in other locations, Huang has started to piece together a picture of the routes sooty terns take to their wintering area.
The miles are piled up because the Arctic terns, which can land on and feed from the sea, do not need to fly direct to their migration destination.
At Gronant, wardens from Denbighshire Countryside Services counted 99 fledged Little Terns after a summer's nest protection; another two were raised nearby at RSPB Point of Ayr.
Raven and Plate Islands are the preferred breeding areas in the Lake Tyers estuary and approximately 25 pairs of terns bred at the Lake Tyers estuary in the 2009/2010 breeding season (F Bedford pers.
For almost 15 years he has studied the terns as part of an ambitious and delicate effort to accommodate the needs of several federally protected species.
Magic Ken said: "It has been both a privilege and a joy to photograph these terns in all their glory.
We surveyed 160 km of the Sonoran coastline for breeding least terns, from Bahia San Jorge in the south to Bahia Adair in the north (30[degrees]530N, 113[degrees]05'Wto31[degrees]29'N, 114[degrees]04'W; Fig.
Gull-billed Terns are usually found on sandy coasts and salt marshes in southern Europe but they are annual visitors to the UK.
The project began in 1996, and last season the rafts attracted about 300 pairs of terns, with 400 chicks fledged, making this the largest and most productive tern territory on Scotland's west coast.
It appears that the terns may have moved to the isolated island, also used by white-cheeked terns and lesser crested terns in response to fox predation or the threat of fox predation.
And yet, least terns live in an ecosystem that, to a large extent, requires seasonal flooding and the occasional "great flood" to ensure continued foraging and nesting habitat.
When a predator approaches, terns exhibit group defense of the breeding colony.