terminology

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terminology

 [ter″mĭ-nol´ah-je]
1. the vocabulary of an art or science.
2. the science that deals with the investigation, arrangement, and construction of terms.

terminology

Informatics
(1) A set of concepts, designations and relationships for a specialised subject area.
(2) In the context of clinical trials, terminology refers to a standardised, finite set of terms (e.g., picklists, MedDRA codes) used to denote patient findings, circumstances, events and interventions.

terminology

Vox populi A body of names assigned to or used for a particular type of thing. See Current procedural terminology, Dictionary, Lexicon, Nomina Anatomica, Terminologia Anatomica.
References in periodicals archive ?
As mentioned in Section 3.3, if in a real application a terminologist applying this method is not interested in such patterns, the list of patterns that feeds the algorithm could eventually be edited after the training.
The International Federation of Translators was founded in Paris in 1953 and is an international federation of national associations representing translators, interpreters, and terminologists with more than 100 member associations from around the world.
The Future of Translators, Interpreters and Terminologists", which all point to the growing importance of technology use in translation.
Wuster emphasized that systemic work should be the domain of terminologists, i.e.
"The Voice of Associations of Translators, Interpreters, and Terminologists, around the world"
Canada has two official languages and since the proclamation of the Official Languages Act in 1969 has pursued a national "top-down" policy of bilingualism that has led to the extension and establishment of a large number of university-level T&I programmes, and the formalisation of certification procedures for not only translators and interpreters, but also "terminologists" (specialists who identify, define and describe usually new terms that are to be used in a uniform and consistent way in both official languages).
While no formal certification for community interpreters yet exists, groups in Ontario and Vancouver are collaborating with the Canadian Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters Council (CTTIC), the national professional association that created the long-established court and conference interpreter certification exams, to explore setting up a certification program for community interpreters.
There is discussion and consensus among many experts in our field that it would benefit from a standard that is specific for the certification of translators, interpreters, and terminologists, and some believe that the International Federation of Interpreters (www.ift-fit.org) would be the right home for such a project.
Ability to work with other professionals involved in the translation process (translators, revisers, documentary researchers, terminologists, project managers, layout specialists), and other actors (clients, initiators, authors, users, subject area experts).