palliative sedation

(redirected from Terminal sedation)
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palliative sedation

The administration of sedative and hypnotic drugs to dying patients to induce coma and alleviate pain and suffering. It is a technique used in end-of-life care when other measures to achieve comfort for the dying patient have failed. Medications such as barbiturates and opiates are used to tranquilize the patient. The intent is not to hasten death, although ultimately, palliative sedation induces a coma from which the patient will not awaken.
See also: sedation
References in periodicals archive ?
Ira Byock (a palliative care doctor who speaks against legalizing physician-assisted suicide while also supporting VSED and terminal sedation) wrote an article titled "Responding to Intractable Terminal Suffering: The Role of Terminal Sedation and Voluntary Refusal of Food and Fluids" [www.
This will depend upon the patient's needs, and the procedure can be performed from a slight sedation to a moderate-severe sedation, also known as deep terminal sedation (a continued and sustained sedation until death), which is the most controversial procedure when trying to make it different from euthanasia (6,11).
2001) Terminal sedation, self-starvation, and orchestrating end of life.
Now her sisters, university professors Jenny and Celia, have published research showing families of some severely brain-injured patients believe, once all other avenues are exhausted, giving relatives in a vegetative state terminal sedation is a humane option.
Now her sisters, university professors Jenny and Celia, have published ground-breaking research showing families of some severely brain injured patients believe, once all other avenues are exhausted, terminal sedation is a humane option.
Concerning terminal sedation, the very name implies that it kills the patient, so how does the well-intentioned doctor avoid committing euthanasia?
Terminal sedation in palliative medicine -- definition and review of the literature.
Terminal sedation is not an automatic right, rather it is left to the discretion of medical staff and may well be administered at the request of family, with little or no input or consent from the patient.
Knowing why such discussions did not occur, especially in cases of palliative or terminal sedation, would be an important first step towards facilitating and improving these important conversations.
Byock for the American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine End-of-Life Care Consensus Panel, "Responding to Intractable Terminal Suffering: The Role of Terminal Sedation and Voluntary Refusal of Food and Fluids," Annals of Internal Medicine 132 (2000): 408-414; L.
It opened the door for terminal sedation as medically appropriate from a Catholic perspective.
Drug-induced terminal sedation for symptom control.
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