bud

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Related to Terminal bud: lateral bud, leaf scar, axillary bud, bud scale scar

bud

 [bud]
1. a structure on a plant, often round, that encloses an undeveloped flower or leaf.
2. something resembling the bud of a plant, especially a protuberance in the embryo from which an organ or part develops.
end bud the remnant of the embryonic primitive knot, from which arises the caudal part of the trunk.
limb bud one of the four lateral swellings appearing in vertebrate embryos, which develop into the two pairs of limbs.
tail bud
the primordium of the caudal appendage.
taste b's end organs of the gustatory nerve containing the receptor surfaces for the sense of taste.
ureteric bud a dorsal outgrowth of the mesonephric duct near its entry into the cloaca; it is the primordium of the ureter, renal pelvis, calices, and collecting tubules of the kidneys.
bud of urethra bulb of urethra.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bud

(bŭd),
1. An outgrowth that resembles the bud of a plant, usually pluripotential, and capable of differentiating and growing into a definitive structure.
See also: gemmation.
2. To give rise to such an outgrowth.
See also: gemmation.
3. A small outgrowth from a parent cell; a form of asexual reproduction.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bud

(bŭd)
n.
1. Botany
a. A small protuberance on a stem or branch, sometimes enclosed in protective scales and containing an undeveloped leaf, flower, or leafy shoot.
b. The stage or condition of having buds: branches in full bud.
2. Biology
a. An asexual reproductive structure, as in yeast or a hydra, that consists of an outgrowth capable of developing into a new individual.
b. A small, rounded organic part, such as a taste bud, that resembles a plant bud.
v. budded, budding, buds
v.intr.
1. To put forth or produce buds: a plant that buds in early spring.
2. To reproduce asexually by forming a bud.

bud′der n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bud

Botany
A small swelling or projection on a plant, from which a shoot, cluster of leaves or flowers develop; a rudimentary, undeveloped shoot, leaf or flower.

Drug slang
A regional term for marijuana.

Embryology
See Syncytial bud.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bud

(bŭd)
1. An outgrowth that resembles the bud of a plant, usually pluripotential, and capable of differentiating and growing into a definitive structure.
2. To give rise to such an outgrowth.
See also: gemmation
3. A small outgrowth from a parent cell; a form of asexual reproduction.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bud

an undeveloped embryonic shoot in a plant containing a meristematic area (see MERISTEM) for cell division, surrounded by leaf primordia (immature leaves) with often an outer protective layer of scales formed from modified leaves. The tip of a twig usually carries a terminal bud, while leaves generally have a lateral bud in their AXILS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Location Pseudoglandular Canalicular Terminal bud Total Parotid 2 (29%) 5 (71%) 0 7 (100%) Submandibular 0 12 (92%) 1 (8%) 13 (100%) Sublingual 1 (20%) 0 4 (80%) 5 (100%) Palate 4 (44%) 1 (11%) 4 (44%) 9 (100%) Lip 5 (28%) 4 (22%) 9 (50%) 18 (100%) Tongue 4 (67%) 0 2 (33%) 6 (100%) Total 16 22 20 58 N = number; (%) = percentage.
Using one of the search engines on the Internet, such as Google, Yahoo!, Ask.com, and MSN Live Search, find more information by searching for these words or phrases: primary roots, asexual propagation, sexual propagation, inflorescence, seed germination, leaf shapes, leaf modifications, imbibition, plumule, hypocotyl hook, dormancy factors, stem cuttings, budding, grafting, layering, bulbs, rhizomes, tubers, corm, herbaceous, perennials, annuals, terminal bud, compound leaves, and simple leaves.
In order to write the generating function, we first have to identify the stochastic process underlying the differentiation of the terminal bud.
The terminal bud-scale scar is left when the terminal bud begins growth in the spring; it represents one year's growth.
([double dagger]) Rating: 0 = no plants exhibiting bud blight symptoms to 6 = 6 or more plants exhibiting terminal bud death.
Twigs are described on the basis of their bud types, terminal buds, bud and leaf arrangements, petiole scar shapes, prominence of their lenticels and stipule scars, and type of pith.
Doorenbos (1953) cites Goebel (1880) as noting that defoliation of a dormant twig during the spring "has been shown again and again to cause the terminal bud to resume growth." It has often been observed that natural defoliation due to herbivory or hailstone damage during the flushing period causes precocious opening of terminal buds (Romberger 1963).
For example, the Capitata Group encompasses the common heading cabbages like savoy, green, red or spring greens varieties, with a terminal bud, botanically speaking.
Remove side buds on dahlias to allow the terminal bud to reach its maximum size or remove the terminal bud for plenty of smaller blooms.
axillary or lateral bud--located along the side of the stem at the base of the entire leaf below the terminal bud.
During fire, burning green needles create a type of moisture shield for the plant's terminal bud. Generally only a very hot fire, one fueled by drought and a heavy buildup of fallen leaves and pine needles, will kill a longleaf pine.
Adult males, which emerge before females, assume a position on the terminal bud of their host-plant to wait for a female (Craig et al., 1993).