shipworm

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Related to Teredinidae: Teredo navalis

shipworm

any marine bivalve mollusc such as Teredo, that bores into woodwork by rotary action of the two shell valves and swallows the sawdust, which is then attacked by special enzymes that make possible the digestion of cellulose.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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polythalamius reproduces by broadcast spawning, as do most Teredinidae. Although the viability of the gametes was not confirmed, the presence of an egg-bearing individual in wood suggests that this species may reach maturity and reproduce within wood, potentially completing the entire life cycle without entering sediments.
Phylogenetic characterization and in situ localization of the bacterial symbiont of shipworms (Teredinidae: Bivalvia) by using 16S rRNA sequence analysis and oligodeoxynucleotide probe hybridization.
McKoy, 'Distribution of Shipworms (Bivalvia: Teredinidae) in the New Zealand Region', New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research 14 (1980): 263-273; M.
Sphaeroma terebrans Bate is common to both sites, as are teredinids, although possible species differences within the Teredinidae have not been surveyed.
Shell and pallet morphology of early developmental stages of Bankia gouldi (Bartsch, 1908) (Bivalva: Teredinidae).
Additional blocks were suspended for four months in order for the pallets, the identifying systematic character, of the bivalve Family Teredinidae, to mature.
nov., a dinitrogen-fixing, cellulolytic, endosymbiotic gamma-proteobacterium isolated from the gills of wood-boring molluscs (Bivalvia: Teredinidae).
The species Cyrtopleura costata and the two wood-boring bivalves, Bankia gouldi and Teredo navalis, represent the families Pholadidae and Teredinidae, respectively (Figs.
Although he received his MA from Harvard University in 1961, in 1962 he was granted a year's leave to take further training in the field of molluscan research, and was able to study under the guidance of Clench and Ruth Turner, who was by then an expert on the Teredinidae, or shipworms.
Dispersal of phytoplanktotrophic shipworm larvae (Bivalvia: Teredinidae) over long distances by ocean currents.