becquerel

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Related to Terabecquerel: Becquerel (Bq), Gigabecquerel, Megabecquerel

becquerel

 (Bq) [bek-ĕ-rel´]
the SI unit of radioactivity, defined as the quantity of a radionuclide that undergoes one decay per second; one curie equals 3.7 × 1010 becquerels.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Bec·que·rel

(bek-ă-rel'),
Antoine H., French physicist and Nobel laureate, 1852-1908. See: becquerel, Becquerel rays.

bec·que·rel (Bq),

(bek-ă-rel'),
The SI unit of measurement of radioactivity, equal to 1 disintegration per second; 1 Bq = 0.027 × 10-9 Ci.
[A. H. Becquerel]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Becquerel

The International System (SI) unit for measuring radioactivity based on radioactive decay, equal to 1 disintegration (nuclear transition)/sec. Named after Antoine-Henri Becquerel, French Nobel Laureate, who discoverered of radioactivity. 

1 Bq = 3.70 x 1010 Ci (Curie, which it supersedes)
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bec·que·rel

(bek-ă-rel')
The SI unit of measurement of radioactivity, equal to 1 disintegration per second; 1 Bq = 0.027 × 10-9 Ci.
See also: absorption
[A. H. Becquerel]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Becquerel

A unit of the strength of radioactivity from a particular source. A Becquerel is defined as one nuclear disintegration per second.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Becquerel,

Antoine H., French physicist and Nobel laureate, 1852-1908.
becquerel - the SI unit of measurement of radioactivity.
Becquerel rays - obsolete term for radiation given off by uranium and other radioactive substances.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile as per reports, Japan's nuclear safety commission has estimated that the Fukushima plant's reactors had released up to 10,000 terabecquerels of radioactive iodine-131 per hour into the air for several hours after they were damaged in the 11 March earthquake and tsunami.
However, back in 1986, the Chernobyl incident released 5.2 million terabecquerels into the air which is 10 times that of the Fukushima plant.