temporal lobe

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Related to Temporal lobes: Occipital lobes, parietal lobes, Frontal lobes

lobe

 [lōb]
1. a more or less well defined portion of an organ or gland.
2. one of the main divisions of a tooth crown.
azygos lobe (lobe of azygos vein) a small anomalous lobe situated at the apex of the right lung, produced when the azygos vein arches over the upper part of the lung instead of at the hilus and presses deeply into the lung tissue to form a fissure that isolates a medial part of the lung.
caudate lobe a small lobe of the liver between the inferior vena cava on the right and the left lobe.
ear lobe the lower fleshy, noncartilaginous portion of the external ear.
flocculonodular lobe one of the main subdivisions of the cerebellum, located inferiorly, consisting of the paired flocculi, their peduncles, and the nodule of the vermis.
frontal lobe the anterior portion of the gray matter of each cerebral hemisphere.
hepatic lobe one of the lobes of the liver, designated the right and left and the caudate and quadrate.
l's of lung the five major subdivisions of the lungs. see accompanying illustration and see lung.
The lobes of the lungs. From Frazier et al., 2000.
occipital lobe the most posterior portion of each cerebral hemisphere, forming a small part of its posterolateral surface. See illustration.
The occipital lobe of the brain. From Applegate, 2000.
parietal lobe the upper central portion of the gray matter of each cerebral hemisphere, between the frontal lobe and the occipital lobe and above the temporal lobe. It is the receptive area for fine sensory stimuli, and the highest integration and coordination of sensory information is carried on here. Damage to it can produce defects in vision or aphasia.
polyalveolar lobe a congenital disorder characterized in early infancy by the presence of far more than the normal number of alveoli in a lobe of the lungs; thereafter, normal multiplication of alveoli does not take place and they become enlarged, i.e., emphysematous.
quadrate lobe
2. a small lobe of the liver, between the gallbladder on the right, and the left lobe.
Riedel's lobe an anomalous tongue-shaped mass of tissue projecting from the right lobe of the liver in some individuals.
spigelian lobe caudate lobe.
temporal lobe a long tongue-shaped process that is the lower lateral portion of each cerebral hemisphere.

tem·po·ral lobe

[TA]
a long lobe, the lowest of the major subdivisions of the cortical mantle, forming the posterior two thirds of the ventral surface of the cerebral hemisphere, separated from the frontal and parietal lobes above it by the lateral sulcus arbitrarily delineated by an imaginary plane from the occipital lobe with which it is continuous posteriorly. The temporal lobe has a heterogeneous composition: in addition to a large neocortical component consisting of the superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyri and the lateral and medial occipitotemporal gyri, it includes the largely juxtallocortical parahippocampal gyrus with its paleocortical (olfactory) uncus and, beneath the latter, the amygdala.

temporal lobe

n.
The lower lateral lobe of either cerebral hemisphere, located in front of the occipital lobe and containing the sensory center of hearing in the brain.

tem·po·ral lobe

(tem'pŏr-ăl lōb) [TA]
The long and lowest of the major subdivisions of the cortical mantle, forming the posterior two thirds of the ventral surface of the cerebral hemisphere, separated from the frontal and parietal lobes above it by the lateral sulcus arbitrarily delineated by an imaginary plane from the occipital lobe with which it is continuous posteriorly. The temporal lobe has a heterogeneous composition: in addition to a large neocortical component consisting of the superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyri and the lateral and medial occipitotemporal gyri, it includes the largely juxtallocortical parahippocampal gyrus with its paleocortical (olfactory) uncus and, beneath the latter, the amygdala.
Synonym(s): lobus temporalis [TA] .

Temporal lobe

The part of each side or hemisphere of the brain that is on the side of the head, nearest the ears.
Mentioned in: Aphasia

tem·po·ral lobe

(tem'pŏr-ăl lōb) [TA]
The long and lowest of the major subdivisions of the cortical mantle, forming the posterior two thirds of the ventral surface of the cerebral hemisphere, separated from the frontal and parietal lobes above it by the lateral sulcus arbitrarily delineated by an imaginary plane from the occipital lobe with which it is continuous posteriorly.
Synonym(s): lobus temporalis [TA] .
References in periodicals archive ?
At the 6-month follow-up, cranial MRI, hyperintensities suggestive of a cystic encephalomalasic area and surrounding gliosis, which caused parenchymal loss in the bilateral temporal lobes involving parahippocampal gyri and extending to bilateral insular cortices were observed (Figure 1).
Voxels of 2 x 2 x 2 [cm.sup.3] were positioned in the regions of the left frontal lobe and left temporal lobe. A trained investigator located voxels by eye by means of T1-weighted sections in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes, and the inclusion of CSF was minimized.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed an area of T1 hypointensity and T2 hyperintensity involving predominantly the white matter of the upper aspect of the left temporal lobe anterior tip.
Research suggested a relationship between memory damage and lateralization of medial temporal lobe (5-7), but the results were not always consistent with the material-specific memory model (8).
The involvement of the mesial temporal lobes in close proximity to the visual apparatus would explain the initial visual manifestation in our case.
One possible explanation is that the temporal lobe discharges could have an inhibitory effect on the limbic system and thus limbic dysfunction secondary to abatement of the temporal seizures could be responsible for the psychosis.
In Figure 12, there is an infiltrating tumor of the left temporal lobe, which is isointense to gray matter on T2, whereas the areas of vasogenic edema surrounding the tumor have increased T2 signal intensity.
Temporal lobes process sensory input and are a common site of epileptic seizures.
Insulin resistance and lower glucose uptake were especially robustly associated in the left medial temporal lobe (R2 = 0.178; P <.05), and lower glucose metabolism in this lobe was associated with worse immediate and delayed memory performance factors (P <.001 for both).
Once epileptiform discharges were confirmed from the mesial temporal lobes, anterior temporal lobectomy or resection of the mesial part of temporal lobes were performed.
Although the exact pathophysiology of SUDEP is not determined, patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy represent an at-risk population because of autonomic dysregulation.
Some of these differences were statistically significant: the overall inter-hemispheric CPL (LInter-H) and the overall left and right intra-hemispheric CPL (LIntra-H) were significantly longer in the patient group than in the control group; the subnetwork inter-hemispheric CPLs for the left and right frontal lobes (LInter-F), temporal lobes (LInter-T), and subcortical structures (LInter-S) were significantly longer in patients than controls; and the subnetwork right intra-hemispheric CPL for the frontal lobe (LIntra-F) was significantly longer in patients than in controls.