teleonomy


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

tel·e·on·o·my

(tel'ē-on'ŏ-mē),
The doctrine that life is characterized by endowment with a project or purpose; that is, the existence in an organism of a structure or function implies that it has had evolutionary survival value.
[G. telos, end, + nomos, law]

teleonomy

(tĕl″ē-ŏn′ō-mē) [″ + nomos, law]
The concept that, in an organism or animal, the existence of a structure, capability, or function indicates that it had survival value.
teleonomic (tĕl″ē-ō-nŏm′ĭk), adjective
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
This last descriptor of complexification of matter, i.e., maintaining complexity at a level permitted by the environment, when applied to animate matter serves to connect complexification to teleonomy. For at the most fundamental level, the purpose of life is to persist.
(66) The more limited term "teleonomy," therefore, more adequately describes Aristotle's grasp of finality and is helpful since it allows biology to proceed to the limits of its inquiry with a clearly circumscribed model of investigation, free from metaphysical or theological concern.
It even shows some purposefulness, or teleonomy, as it balances oxygen, nitrogen and other physical conditions at their best ratios for sustaining life, Gaian nature is just one more example of the beauty and morality inherent in the universe even before there are humans around to appreciate such qualities.
For example, he draws a sharp distinction between cosmic teleology and "teleonomy," the informational programs of DNA that play a crucial role in organic development and behavior (p.
Teleonomy becomes only an artifice of the description of autopoietic systems from an external position.
Gennaro Auletta, Ivan Colage, and Pablo D'Ambrosio coauthor the sixth chapter, "The Game of Life Implies Both Teleonomy and Teleology," arguing that both teleonomy and teleology are valid explanatory mechanisms in biology.
(26) In 1919, Frascesco Varela, in cooperation with his teacher and colleague Humberto Maturana, introduced the notion of biological autonomy, which is somewhat differentiated from a genetic teleonomy of species.
(Biologists refer to this property as 'teleonomy'--an evolved internal teleology.) Much productive research has flowed from this paradigm, in fields as disparate as control engineering, molecular biology, plant physiology, neurobiology, psychology and economics.
Monod recognizes three characteristics of living things: teleonomy, autonomous morphogenesis, and reproductive invariability.
With the emergence of the EES and other alternatives to the NDMS model, there is an increasing amount of evidence that the existence of such internal teleology (teleonomy) in evolution cannot be ruled out.