cooperative learning

(redirected from Team-based learning)

cooperative learning

Education theory A student-centered teaching strategy in which heterogeneous groups of students work to achieve a common academic goal–eg, completing a case study or a evaluating a QC problem. See Problem-based learning, Socratic method.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cooperative learning

An educational strategy in which learners join in small, structured groups to complete educational tasks, solve problems together, and further each other's understanding of material.

cooperative learning

A teaching strategy in which learners join in small structured groups to complete educational tasks, solve problems together, and further each other’s understanding of material.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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The buildings also include interactive displays with touch screen capabilities, in order to coincide with the school's curriculum, which often relies on a team-based learning approach.
Michael Corcoran, an expert in workplace and school violence and an outside consultant for Vance International, a trusted investigation and security consulting firm, says that the culture surrounding today's children is markedly different from the one that baby boomers grew up in, with more of an emphasis on collective, team-based learning experiences.
* While some workshop-based learning still is used to train staff on new content, the main focus is on job-embedded, differentiated, and team-based learning.
Although there are many benefits to team-based learning, adding the complexities of group dynamics to a service-learning project can be challenging.
Nevertheless, simply situating students in team-based learning tasks does not necessarily achieve collaboration effects (Gelmini-Hornsby, Ainsworth, & O'Malley, 2011).
Small-group learning in higher education--cooperative, collaborative, problem-based, and team-based learning: an introduction by the guest editors.
Workshops and seminars in the conference were offered on best practices across the university including teaching methods focusing on team-based learning, engaging critical reflection, role play, the role of technology in advancing learning and project based learning.
Therefore, group or team-based learning is more successful with those students than the traditional single-student approach, he believes.
Thus, while mPBL has the same goals as PBL it differs from this pure form by incorporating critical elements such as collaborative team-based learning, Triple-Jump Competency learning and empowerment principles and practices.
Many of these are simple to implement and stand alone from the overall structure of the course (e.g., think-pair-share activities, one-minute papers, classroom experiments), while others require an instructor to fundamentally rethink the organization of the course (e.g., any number of "flipped classroom" techniques such as Team-based Learning [TBL]).