tea plant


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to tea plant: Ti plant, Coffee plant

tea plant

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The research between the relationship of the tea green leafhopper and the tea plant is a dynamic one.
6) While much was still unknown about tea plant pathogens in late nineteenth century Assam, the late arrival of metropolitan scientific intervention on these matters led planters to forge discursive networks of vernacular pest management, tap 'native' knowhow and be sensitive to local environmental conditions, as I go on to demonstrate in this article.
Moreover, the unique look and taste of eco-tea are considered an index of the powerful link that has been re-established between humans and the natural world: 'That heaven and earth (tian yu di) can produce a tea plant of great character, vitality, and fine flavour without almost any of the traditional interventions by humans proves to me that .
Tea is made from the tender leaves of the tea plant, a species of ever- green types.
On the other hand, the higher TOC content of bleached paddy soil and yellow earth in autumn may result from accumulation of organic matter from tea plant litter produced from pruning and natural shedding of leaves and stems (Li, 1997; Tian, 2001); and the lower TOC content of acid purple soil in autumn might be due to more- intensive soil erosion.
However, when the level of Al is higher than a critical concentration, there can be negative effects on tea plant growth (Fung et al.
In 1824 a tea plant was brought to Ceylon, as it was called then, by the British from China and was planted in the Royal Botanical Gardens in Peradeniya, in the central province.
Tea's soothing qualities come from L-theanine, a unique amino acid found only in the tea plant camellia sinensis, which produces black, oolong, and green tea.
Green tea has always been, and remains today, the most popular type of tea from China where most historians and botanists believe the tea plant originated.
The high altitude region in which they live, among the evergreen forests above the Mekong River, is the motherland of the tea plant.
The tea plant does best thrive under high and uniformly distributed rainfall with a minimal dry season and a mean annual temperature of 18-20oC, within a range of 12-30oC.