taxonomy

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taxonomy

 [tak-son´ah-me]
the orderly classification of organisms or lists into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names. adj., adj taxonom´ic.
numerical taxonomy a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē),
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories being larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined, and the lower categories being more restricted, with fewer species more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra- and supra- or sub- and super- categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, group, etc., are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

taxonomy

(tăk-sŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. taxono·mies
1. The classification and naming of organisms in an ordered system that is intended to indicate natural relationships, especially evolutionary relationships.
2. The science, laws, or principles of classification.
3. An ordered arrangement of groups or categories: a taxonomy of literary genres.

tax·on′o·mist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra-, supra-, sub-, and super categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, and group, are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

taxonomy

The science or principles of biological classification and the assignment of appropriate names to species.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

taxonomy

the study of the CLASSIFICATION of organisms. Classical taxonomy involves the use of morphological features, cytotaxonomy the use of somatic chromosomes, experimental taxonomy involves the determining of genetical interrelationships, and numerical taxonomy involves quantitative assessments of similarities and differences in an attempt to make objective assessments.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety).
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
As a citation, the picture allows Douglass to compete discursively against established ethnographers such as Josiah Nott, James Prichard, and Richard Knox for the authority to analyze and taxonomize Africanicity, both ancient and diasporic.
By trying to taxonomize the overwhelming variety of meanings that language communicates, SFG theorists ignore the systematic structure of language.
Cixous, that is, explicitly and repeatedly calls for the destruction or "burst[ing]" (94) of the mechanisms of language that underpin the symbolic, those discursive mechanisms that "partition" the primal Voice into discrete semantic units, taxonomize them into "classes" (94) and lay down the rules for their re-joining, those mechanisms, that is to say, of "syntax" (96) and of "rhetoric" (94).
It thus became the obligation of the ethnic Vietnamese to count, label, evaluate, taxonomize, and tutor other ethnic groups in an attempt to determine their distance or proximity to the civilizing center.
If thinking is teleopragmatic, then it is a mistake to taxonomize mental phenomena in terms of their representational powers or contents.
battle over how to taxonomize First Amendment injuries, like retaliation
In this respect it performs the sensual impulses that will first lead the bird-lover to taxonomize. Simms's "Snowy Owl" is far closer to the problematics of the "landscape-language linkage" discussed above, as it attempts to grasp what he calls the owl's "formless force." Simms, like Haslam, seeks what is natural in language in the poem's sonic patterning, not in describing or even mimicking this "formless force." As a consequence, its force indeed attains dizzying, aporetic form, a grafting of Hopkinsian experiments onto a tabular page.
In this essay, the authors taxonomize research methods of writing center studies and, as a result, provide us with a "powerful tool to generate critical thinking, helping us to classify, critique, and retrieve knowledge," drawing together a rich array of research from our field in order to help the reader better understand the ways in which we make knowledge and the kinds of questions each method best answers.
To taxonomize the modes of dispute resolution employed in response to mass injuries ranging from asbestos inhalation to tobacco use to the September 11 World Trade Center deaths is implicitly to draw upon conceptions of distributive justice, whether or not Rawls or Sen is explicitly referenced.
I will suggest, in conclusion, that Cino's legal training may influence his desire to taxonomize these experiences and to range himself within a larger collective, even when that collective is unfamiliar and undesirable by the normal standards of his society.
Vessey and Weber [3], analyzing decisions made by programmers, found that structured English outperforms decision tables when the task is to taxonomize, but decision tables outperform structured English in sequencing.
If The Legal Process did no more than define and taxonomize the varieties of legal activity in society, it would still be significant as an early example of the influence of the Law and Society movement on mainstream legal education.(28) Hidden behind Hart and Sacks's broad view of the relationship of law and society, however, is a subtle twist that makes it much more normative than it would first appear.