taxonomy

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taxonomy

 [tak-son´ah-me]
the orderly classification of organisms or lists into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names. adj., adj taxonom´ic.
numerical taxonomy a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē),
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories being larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined, and the lower categories being more restricted, with fewer species more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra- and supra- or sub- and super- categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, group, etc., are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

taxonomy

(tăk-sŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. taxono·mies
1. The classification and naming of organisms in an ordered system that is intended to indicate natural relationships, especially evolutionary relationships.
2. The science, laws, or principles of classification.
3. An ordered arrangement of groups or categories: a taxonomy of literary genres.

tax·on′o·mist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra-, supra-, sub-, and super categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, and group, are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

taxonomy

The science or principles of biological classification and the assignment of appropriate names to species.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

taxonomy

the study of the CLASSIFICATION of organisms. Classical taxonomy involves the use of morphological features, cytotaxonomy the use of somatic chromosomes, experimental taxonomy involves the determining of genetical interrelationships, and numerical taxonomy involves quantitative assessments of similarities and differences in an attempt to make objective assessments.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety).
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Shannon Hildenbrand, international taxonomy lead; Alice Wallace, taxonomy analyst; and Andrew Childress, taxonomy analyst, also offered insights on how Indeed.com (www.indeed.com) organizes its database during their session, "Classification and Communication: Taxonomy Case Studies at Indeed." Indeed's latest project initiative, which is a natural language processing tool, was created by cross-cultural and remote collaboration between taxonomists, developers, and the Texas and Tokyo offices.
According to the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, there are more than 30-million species worldwide, but taxonomists have identified only about 1.78 million species of animals, plants and microorganisms in 250 years of research.
According to the CBD, in a world populated with more than 30 million species, taxonomists have identified only about 1.78 million species of animals, plants and microorganisms in 250 years of research.
Taxonomists can refer to a particular specimen via its CUID without ambiguity."
Randall for being with other great ichthyologists and taxonomists on the board of directors all these years and for their support and trust in aqua.
It might seem that, as the pool of undescribed species diminishes, the rate at which taxonomists describe new species should decline.
According to Enrique Macpherson, researcher at the Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC, Spain), who has participated in the study: "Bringing together the leading taxonomists around the world to pool their information has been the great merit of this research."
Most traditional taxonomists working with museum collections do not have that option, because the color is lost in the preserved specimens.
In this way, students gain an appreciation for the activities undertaken by taxonomists that are related to natural variation and classification.
While at sea, taxonomists identified the organisms under microscopes while researchers sequenced their genes to create unique DNA "bar codes" to identify species.
Perhaps the International Year of Biodiversity also provides an opportunity for biologists, particularly taxonomists working on African invertebrates, to reflect on our contributions to biodiversity conservation and to consider real integration of the discipline into biodiversity conservation.
A sub committee was nominated to coordinate with all plant taxonomists and institutions and give recommendations before the next Council meeting.