taxonomy

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taxonomy

 [tak-son´ah-me]
the orderly classification of organisms or lists into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names. adj., adj taxonom´ic.
numerical taxonomy a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē),
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories being larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined, and the lower categories being more restricted, with fewer species more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra- and supra- or sub- and super- categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, group, etc., are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

taxonomy

(tăk-sŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. taxono·mies
1. The classification and naming of organisms in an ordered system that is intended to indicate natural relationships, especially evolutionary relationships.
2. The science, laws, or principles of classification.
3. An ordered arrangement of groups or categories: a taxonomy of literary genres.

tax·on′o·mist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra-, supra-, sub-, and super categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, and group, are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

taxonomy

The science or principles of biological classification and the assignment of appropriate names to species.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

taxonomy

the study of the CLASSIFICATION of organisms. Classical taxonomy involves the use of morphological features, cytotaxonomy the use of somatic chromosomes, experimental taxonomy involves the determining of genetical interrelationships, and numerical taxonomy involves quantitative assessments of similarities and differences in an attempt to make objective assessments.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety).
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
* Latest applications of taxonomies including NLP, semantics and machine learning; and
All advocated adhering to standards when building taxonomies to assure interoperability, extensibility, consistency, and ease of migration in the future.
Commercial entities offering pre-built taxonomies include the following:
Let's examine some of the differences between the two taxonomies for insight into this problem.
Instead, the focus moved to creating new taxonomies (Anderson, 1983; Merrill, 1983; Reigeluth & Moore, 1999), or the use of the taxonomy within a particular discipline, such as mathematics (Gierl, 1997), writing (Granello, 2001), music (Hanna, 2007), and technology (McKenzie, 2003; Tyran, 2010).
Our approach envisaged providing a framework allowing its users to build AF taxonomies, AF thesaurus, and finally, in future research work, to reuse both for building an AF domain ontology.
In cooperation with WAND, Inc - one of the leading providers of enterprise taxonomies - Layer2 additionally offers pre-defined Taxonomy Metadata for Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010, a robust and expanding library of taxonomies covering a wide variety of domains to help jumpstart classification projects.
counterpart) certain accounting elements and terms that are common to both taxonomies. This bridge of common XBRL elements between U.S.
I have begun to suspect that the best justification for taxonomies isn't to defend the traditional view but to suggest instead that, rather than a one-size-fits-all taxonomy, we should let individuals develop their own custom view of the content hierarchy.
GAAP Taxonomies and common reporting practices, which were developed under a contract with the Securities and Exchange Commission.