taxonomy

(redirected from Taxonomic groups)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

taxonomy

 [tak-son´ah-me]
the orderly classification of organisms or lists into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names. adj., adj taxonom´ic.
numerical taxonomy a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē),
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories being larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined, and the lower categories being more restricted, with fewer species more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra- and supra- or sub- and super- categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, group, etc., are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy

(tăk-sŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. taxono·mies
1. The classification and naming of organisms in an ordered system that is intended to indicate natural relationships, especially evolutionary relationships.
2. The science, laws, or principles of classification.
3. An ordered arrangement of groups or categories: a taxonomy of literary genres.

tax·on′o·mist n.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra-, supra-, sub-, and super categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, and group, are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy

The science or principles of biological classification and the assignment of appropriate names to species.

taxonomy

the study of the CLASSIFICATION of organisms. Classical taxonomy involves the use of morphological features, cytotaxonomy the use of somatic chromosomes, experimental taxonomy involves the determining of genetical interrelationships, and numerical taxonomy involves quantitative assessments of similarities and differences in an attempt to make objective assessments.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety).
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
References in periodicals archive ?
Two studies have been published for the Colombian Pacific, one by Carvajal, Vergara & Lopez (2009) who analyzed the effects of El Nino and La Nina on four taxonomic groups at the genus level, including euphausiids, and one by Lopez & Medellin (2010), who described the taxonomic composition and spatial variation in abundance of euphausiids in superficial samples taken in the Colombian Pacific Basin in July 2006.
The mean values of abundance (community and taxonomic groups) were compared by the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test (p <0.05), with BioEstat software version 5.3 (Mamiraua Institute, Belem).
From the papers analyzed here, 60 contain information related to the concentration of carbon (%) in biomass at the species level or for other taxonomic groups. A fraction of predefined carbon value or taken from another bibliographic reference was used in 34 documents.
The main taxonomic groups expressing protein-encoding transcripts belonged to Bifidobacterium, Collinsella, Blautia, Lachnoclostridium, and unidentified Firmicutes (Figure 2).
In the 16 northwestern Ohio counties, the most abundant taxonomic groups (mean [+ or -] standard deviation) were beech (26.9% [+ or -] 14.0%), oak (18.2% [+ or -] 11.0%), ash (14.4% [+ or -] 3.3%), elm (10.6% [+ or -] 6.2%), maple (10.1% [+ or -] 4.0%), and hickory (9.8% [+ or -] 3.5%).
NMDS ordination of arthropod taxonomic group abundances resulted in a stress of 0.105 with three dimensions using an alternative Gower dissimilarity, which includes weights to exclude double zeros (i.e., joint absences between taxonomic groups; Anderson et al.
Zooplankton assemblage in the near-shore habitat of IMA included 13 holoplanktonic and 7 meroplanktonic taxonomic groups. Crustaceans, numerically dominated total zooplankton abundance (92.3%) (Fig.
Most paleontologists specialize in a particular taxonomic group or period of Earth history, but demonstrating his versatility as a paleontologist and recognizing the lack of study in Tennessee, Corgan parlayed his highly varied interests into a long list of contributions to Tennessee paleontology spanning many taxonomic groups.
Trophic groups are often thought to reflect ecological relationships better than taxonomic groups, especially when assessing the functional effects of environmental impacts (Higgins, 2010).
Several taxonomic groups showed higher abundance under specific crops.