taxonomy

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taxonomy

 [tak-son´ah-me]
the orderly classification of organisms or lists into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names. adj., adj taxonom´ic.
numerical taxonomy a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē),
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories being larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined, and the lower categories being more restricted, with fewer species more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra- and supra- or sub- and super- categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, group, etc., are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy

/tax·on·o·my/ (tak-son´ah-me) the orderly classification of organisms into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names.taxonom´ic
numerical taxonomy  a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.

taxonomy

(tăk-sŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. taxono·mies
1. The classification and naming of organisms in an ordered system that is intended to indicate natural relationships, especially evolutionary relationships.
2. The science, laws, or principles of classification.
3. An ordered arrangement of groups or categories: a taxonomy of literary genres.

tax·on′o·mist n.

taxonomy

[takson′əmē]
Etymology: Gk, taxis, arrangement, nomos, rule
a system for classifying organisms according to their natural relationships on the basis of such common factors as embryology, structure, or physiological chemistry. The system has seven main levels, or taxa, each more comprehensive than those below it: kingdom, phylum (or division), class, order, family, genus, and species. Humans are members of the species Homo sapiens, of the genus Homo, in the family Hominidae in the order Primates, in the class Mammalia, in the phylum Chordata, in the kingdom Animalia. taxonomic, adj.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra-, supra-, sub-, and super categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, and group, are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy

The science or principles of biological classification and the assignment of appropriate names to species.

taxonomy

the study of the CLASSIFICATION of organisms. Classical taxonomy involves the use of morphological features, cytotaxonomy the use of somatic chromosomes, experimental taxonomy involves the determining of genetical interrelationships, and numerical taxonomy involves quantitative assessments of similarities and differences in an attempt to make objective assessments.

taxonomy (ta·ksôˑ·n·mē),

n 1., any specialized method of classifying objects or events.
2., scientific system used to classify living organisms.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety).
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy

the orderly classification of organisms into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names.

numerical taxonomy
a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, taxonomic groups should at least be considered when attempting to define the most appropriate carbon fraction used to estimate carbon stocks in forest ecosystems.
In other studies, the presence of these taxonomic groups was not observed in pasture areas (Moco et al.
Relative abundance summaries for the 15 taxonomic groups used by county.
The alignment of taxonomic groups with the vector direction visually represents this relationship.
Twelve zooplankton taxonomic groups were identified at the species level using as principal sources, but not exclusively, standard taxonomic keys for Copepoda (Palomares-Garcia et al, 1998; Razouls et al, 2005-2012, http://copepodes.
Variables Taxonomic groups Trophic groups NMS 1 NMS 2 NMS 1 NMS 2 Elevation (m) 0.
The current study tests whether the recovery period of macrobenthic communities depends on fishing intensity aiming to achieve the following objectives: (1) to assess the relationship between fishing intensity and changes in macrobenthic community patterns, concerning medium-term impacts and potential recovery; (2) to examine whether main taxonomic groups can be differentially affected by bivalve dredging; and (3) to evaluate changes in biological traits in relation to fishing intensity.
Nevertheless, few studies verify whether the different taxonomic groups (for example rotifers, cladocerans and copepods) present congruent responses among groups and if these responses correlate to environmental gradients.
Molecular dating may be especially attractive for taxonomic groups without a strong fossil record, and for which age estimates are scarce.
It follows the format of the earlier two volumes, in that the sections on individual taxonomic groups are written by different international specialists--in this case 51 in all, representing 20 countries.
These taxonomic groups, when found, can show that in the system studied, there is a high level of organic matter (KOENING, 1983), which was proved in this study, making us think that as the intensive system is the one in which there is a higher level of density of shrimps and, as a result, a higher level of organic matter, there will be a higher consumption of food and higher metabolic levels produced by the animals cultivated.