sauce béarnaise syndrome

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Related to Taste aversion: Garcia Effect

sauce béarnaise syndrome

An acquired and permanent conditioned response (e.g., severe nausea) which develops shortly after exposure to a particular stimulus (e.g., béarnaise sauce), as well as other tastes and odours.

First decribed by Martin Seligman 1972, after experiencing nausea following ingestion of béarnaise sauce, it was later developed by John Garcia as a rat model for conditioned taste aversion, using an array of noxious stimuli. Of the stimuli, only tastes and odours evoked the conditioned response, leading him to conclude that it was an evolutionary adaptation to avoid spoilt or poisonous food, which Garcia termed the preparedness hypothesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In these studies, the contextual control of LiCl-based taste aversion was unaffected by posttraining extinction treatments.
The purpose of the study was to examine the ability of Magtein to affect the extinction and spontaneous recovery (SR) on conditioned taste aversion.
Enhancement of inhibitory avoidance and conditioned taste aversion memory with insular cortex infusions of 8-Br-cAMP: involvement of the basolateral amygdala.
A 3-year evaluation of taste aversion coyote control in Saskatchewan.
A pair of studies the UCLA scientist published in 1966, 11 years after his first experiments on conditioned taste aversion, provide a vivid demonstration that animals are biologically prepared to learn about taste in a way that differs from how they learn about other sensations.
Experiment 2 examined the effects of swim stress on another phenomenon involving CS-alone presentations: the reacquisition of an extinguished taste aversion.
B6 Mouse Alcohol withdrawal seizure severity (acute & chronic) Alcohol-conditioned taste aversion 2 ISS.
Goel HC and Shobi V (2001) Protection against radiation induced conditioned taste aversion by Centella asciatica.
Granisetron attenuates exercise-induced conditioned taste aversion in the rat.
Conditioned taste aversion induced by self-administered drugs: Paradox revisited.
Since our first publication in 1985, we have been researching age differences in conditioned taste aversion (Valliere, Peterson, Misanin, & Hinderliter, 1985).
In the early 1980s, a number of studies determined that the presence of a sick "demonstrator" rat could produce a taste aversion in a healthy "observer" (e.