sauce béarnaise syndrome

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Related to Taste aversion: Garcia Effect

sauce béarnaise syndrome

An acquired and permanent conditioned response (e.g., severe nausea) which develops shortly after exposure to a particular stimulus (e.g., béarnaise sauce), as well as other tastes and odours.

First decribed by Martin Seligman 1972, after experiencing nausea following ingestion of béarnaise sauce, it was later developed by John Garcia as a rat model for conditioned taste aversion, using an array of noxious stimuli. Of the stimuli, only tastes and odours evoked the conditioned response, leading him to conclude that it was an evolutionary adaptation to avoid spoilt or poisonous food, which Garcia termed the preparedness hypothesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The reduction of the taste aversion on the test day (i.e., latent inhibition) in the groups without change of temporal contexts was congruent with the effect of a two-day pre-exposure period (De la Casa & Lubow, 1995, 2001; Lubow, 2009; Lubow & De la Casa, 2005, 2010).
Food aversion learning in sheep: persistence of conditioned taste aversions to palatable shrubs (Cercocarpus montanus and Amelanchier alnifolia).
AAB and ABA renewal as a function of the number of extinction trials in conditioned taste aversion. Psicologica, 28, 129-150.
In these studies, the contextual control of LiCl-based taste aversion was unaffected by posttraining extinction treatments.
(1999) Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the insular cortex disrupts taste aversion and spatial memory formation.
Taste discrimination in conditioned taste aversion of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis.
Enhancement of inhibitory avoidance and conditioned taste aversion memory with insular cortex infusions of 8-Br-cAMP: involvement of the basolateral amygdala.
Ader & Cohen, 1982), raising the possibility that taste aversion contributes to the strength of conditioned responding (see below).
He refers to the behavior as conditioned taste aversion, but many animal investigators call it simply the Garcia effect.
Bourne, Calton, Gustayson, and Schachtman (1992) and Revusky and Reilly (1989), using inescapable swim as a source of stress, examined the effects of this stressor on conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in rats.