tartrazine


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tar·tra·zine

(tar'tră-zēn), [C.I. 19140]
A yellow acid dye used in place of orange G in a variant of Mallory aniline blue stain for collagen and cellular inclusion bodies.
Synonym(s): hydrazine yellow

tartrazine

FD&C Yellow No. 5, see there.

tartrazine

(tăr′tră-zēn″)
A pyrazole aniline dye widely used to color foods, cosmetics, drugs, and textiles. Its use has been linked to hives and other allergic-type reactions in some individuals.

tartrazine

an AZO DYE that produces a yellow colour, widely used as a food additive (E102).
References in periodicals archive ?
Freundlich and langmuir adsorption isotherms and kinetics for the removal of tartrazine from aqueous solutions using hen feathers.
Effect of food azo dyes tartrazine and carmoisine on biochemical parameters related to renal, hepatic function and oxidative stress biomarkers in young male rats.
Tartrazine is a water soluble organic anionic dye with formula C16H9N4Na3O9S2.
The first thing is to become a careful label reader and avoid products that list any dye with a number such as Yellow #5 or tartrazine.
There are chemicals such as formaldehyde, MSG and tartrazine amongst others, which could cause concern for allergy sufferers, if used on a regular basis and especially over a long period," Lindsey McManus, Deputy CEO, Allergy UK said:
The behavioral effects elicited by the tartrazine challenges, however, involved irritability, fidgetiness and sleep problems which are not typically representative of hyperactivity related behaviors.
The new CPE-based LCMS method was used for the analysis of approved water soluble (Sunset yellow, Allura red, Tartrazine and Erythrosine) and banned fat soluble (Sudan I-IV, Sudan red G, Sudan red B, Sudan red 7B, Sudan black B, Metanil yellow and Rhodaminc B) azo colors.
One in five contained either sunset yellow, allura red, ponceau 4R or tartrazine.
In one, published in the Journal of Nutritional Medicine in 1990, the scientists investigated how the yellow dye tartrazine affected the zinc levels of 10 hyperactive boys, compared with 10 nonhyperactive peers.
New considerations regarding the risk assessment on Tartrazine .
The second most commonly used dye, which is also known as tartrazine, causes sometimes-severe hypersensitivity reactions, mainly hives, in some people.
According to ARS microbiologist Ilenys Perez-Diaz and her colleagues, some species of Lactobacilli--food-related microorganisms-can cause the red coloring when combined with tartrazine, which is a yellow food-coloring agent.