tartar

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Related to Tartars: Genghis Khan, Cossacks

tartar

 [tahr´ter]

tar·tar

(tar'tăr),
1. A crust on the interior of wine casks, consisting essentially of potassium bitartrate.
2. A white, brown, or yellow-brown deposit at or below the gingival margin of teeth, chiefly hydroxyapatite in an organic matrix. Synonym(s): dental calculus (2)
[Mediev. L. tartarum, ult. etym. unknown]

tartar

(tär′tər)
n.
Dentistry A hard yellowish deposit on the teeth, consisting of organic secretions and food particles deposited in various salts, such as calcium carbonate. Also called calculus.

calculus

Dentistry
Indurated, yellow-brown/black deposits on teeth formed by bacteria in dental plaques from mineralised calcium salts in saliva and subgingival transudates. 

Kidneys
A stone in the urinary tract.

Pathology
An abnormal, often calcium-rich mass found in various tissues, seen by light microscopy.

tartar

Calculus Dentistry Hardened gray-white preplaque goo composed of hydroxyapatite, food bacteria, which adheres to teeth after a meal; tartar and plaque cause bone inflammation around teeth known as periodontia. See Caries.

tar·tar

(tahr'tăr)
1. A white, brown, or yellow-brown deposit at or below the gingival margin of the teeth, chiefly hydroxyapatite in an organic matrix.
Synonym(s): dental calculus (2) .
2. A crust on the interior of wine casks, consisting essentially of potassium bitartrate.

tartar

See DENTAL CALCULUS.

Tartar

A hardened yellow or brown mineral deposit from unremoved plaque; also called calculus.
Mentioned in: Oral Hygiene

tar·tar

(tahr'tăr)
A white, brown, or yellow-brown deposit at or below the gingival margin of teeth, chiefly hydroxyapatite in an organic matrix.
Synonym(s): dental calculus (2) .
References in periodicals archive ?
Now that the Crimean Parliament's initiative to annex the region to Russia will be put to a vote through a referendum to be held in mid-March, Tartars will be left to the mercy of the Russians should the results endorse annexation.
Apart from identifying with the Turkic Tartars of Crimea, Turkey hosts a significant Tatar population domestically.
The novel imagined a Habsburg-like empire whose desert frontier was historically threatened by Tartar tribesmen, blamed for reducing the town surrounding Bastiani to ruins.
However, auds will need in-depth program notes to stay in steppe with pic's very oblique story of how a Cossack falls for a blue-sky-eyed Tartar beauty across a cultural divide.
He had infantry, cavalry, arquebusiers, Cossacks and many Tartars, with heavy artillery, which was shipped down the Volga.
"The dying Tartars, stunned and stupefied by the immensity of the disaster brought about by the disease, and realizing that they had no hope of escape, lost interest in the siege.
The outermost of Beijing's concentric rectangles housed the lower ranking civil servants and was known as the Inner City, or Tartar City (all Chinese inhabitants were driven out into the Outer City in the seventeenth century).
A strange (or perhaps inevitable) time, then, for this melange of La Bayadere, Le Corsaire, and Raymonda, with its good Westerners (the Polish court), evil invaders (the Tartar hordes), all-powerful Khan, pure princess (named Maria) and fiance (Vaslav), alluring harem favorite (Zarema), and a pileup of pillage, seduction, treachery, and death.
Since the start of the events in Ukraine, the vast majority of Crimean Tartars have moved in accordance with the changes afoot in Ukraine.
Fortunately the front cover carries what could well be a sub-title, 'One girl's struggle to find her true home.' For that girl is Safinar, known mostly as Safi, a Crimean Tartar who with her parents and her brother, Lutfi, had been living in exile in Uzbekistan since the Second World War.
The recipe for this tartar sauce comes from the late Alphonse "Mose" Bambenek, owner of the nationally known Hot Fish Shop restaurant that opened in 1931 and closed in 1999 four years after his death.