tarsal tunnel


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tunnel

 [tun´el]
a passageway of varying length through a solid body, completely enclosed except for the open ends, permitting entrance and exit.
carpal tunnel the osseofibrous passage for the median nerve and the flexor tendons, formed by the flexor retinaculum and the carpal bones; see also carpal tunnel syndrome.
flexor tunnel carpal tunnel.
tarsal tunnel the osseofibrous passage for the posterior tibial vessels, tibial nerve, and flexor tendons, formed by the flexor retinaculum and the tarsal bones; see also tarsal tunnel syndrome.

tarsal tunnel

The osteofibrous canal in the tarsal area bounded by the flexor retinaculum and tarsal bones. The posterior tibial vessels, tibial nerve, and flexor tendons pass through this tunnel.
See also: tunnel
References in periodicals archive ?
Dellon, "The four medial ankle tunnels: a critical review of perceptions of tarsal tunnel syndrome and neuropathy," Neurosurgery Clinics of North America, vol.
Moreover, the occurrence of the tarsal tunnel syndrome on the side affected by disc disease is much higher than on the unaffected side (13.2% vs.
Compression in a fibroosseous tunnel Carpal tunnel syndrome Cubital tunnel syndrome Tarsal tunnel syndrome b.
Neurovascular The posterior tibial nerve (between the FDL and FHL tendons) may become entrapped in the tarsal tunnel. Etiologies include soft tissue masses, such as ganglion cysts, tendon pathology with thickening and mass effect, thickening of the flexor retinaculum, or, less commonly, osseous abnormalities (Figure 13).
F.R.: Tarsal tunnel syndrome is the ankle-foot equivalent of the wrist-hand carpal tunnel syndrome.
Permanent Residuals: Soft tissue crushing injury resulting in tarsal tunnel syndrome and Morton's neuroma.
Using a medial incision lateral to the posterior tibial artery, dissection of the tarsal tunnel was carried out.
The presence of AFDL is believed to be associated with tarsal tunnel syndrome [15, 26, 28-30], club foot [31], and flexor hallucis syndrome [32].
Plantar fasciitis does not cause paresthesias or other neurologic symptoms, so their presence is suggestive of a different diagnosis, such as nerve entrapment, compartment syndrome, or tarsal tunnel syndrome.
(1) Hyperpronation of the foot is also associated with tarsal tunnel syndrome, though the condition is less common in the general population.
Heelpain triad: the combination of plantar fascutis, posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and tarsal tunnel syndrome.