signal peptide

(redirected from Target sequence)

signal peptide

a short sequence that directs PROTEINS to, and across, MEMBRANES. see LEADER PEPTIDE.
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In effect, CRISPR also acts like a restriction enzyme except that, rather than the DNA target sequence to be cleaved being determined by a fixed amino acid sequence of the enzyme, CRISPR binds to an interchangeable -20 base RNA known as a crRNA (which is homologous to the DNA target sequence to be cut) and a second activating RNA known as a traer RNA.
The single guide RNA (sgRNA) target sequence against pig CD163 (Gene ID: 397031) was determined with an online search tool (https:// www.atum.bio) (Figure 1A).
PAM sequence is also reported to be involved in earlier association of CRSIPR/Cas9 complex with the target region and it is the place where separation of targeted DNA strands is initiated Position and sequence of P M motif is CRISPR Cas9 type specific P M usually starts with - NGG - and it is present at downstream region of target sequence [15].
Target sequence of pneumolysin (PLY) was retrieved from Expert Protein Analysis System (ExPASY) proteomic server (www.
The 5' terminus of the D-Probe (i.e., "flap") is independent of the target sequence and thus serves as a universal reporter in the downstream step of signal readout.
Noteworthily, no target sequence for miR-29b was identified in the 3'-UTR of COL10A1 mRNA.
For CRISPR Cas9 system to recognize 20 bp long target sequence, a PAM (Protospacer Adjacent Motif) sequence is present at 3' end of the target sequence.
Boston, MA, September 24, 2016 --(PR.com)-- Gene editing broadly refers to a suite of methods that use programmable endonuclease to target a specific site in the genome that can induce double stranded break (DSB) which are then repaired by disrupting or modifying the target sequence. There are four major classes of gene editing technologies, including meganuclease and their derivatives, Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic (CRISPR)-associated nuclease Cas9.
Therefore, one may assume that the higher the number of responses per sequence (and, thus, the number of possible sequences), less likely the resurgence of the target sequence. In the present study we have directly investigated this variable by comparing sequences with three and with five responses.
Different primer sets were used to examine if the target sequence could be produced consistently or if some primer locations were better than others.
There may not be amplicons covering the extreme 5' and 3' ends of a target sequence, since the first and last primers maybe located some distance (maximum of x/2) from the ends.