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tar

 [tahr]
a dark brown or black viscid liquid from the wood of various species of pine, or found as a by-product of the destructive distillation of bituminous coal (see coal tar). It is a complex mixture, the source of organic substances such as cresol, creosol, naphthalene, paraffin, phenol, and toluene. Formerly used as an oral medication in treatment of various conditions, it has been found to be toxic and carcinogenic and now has only limited topical use in certain skin diseases.
coal tar a by-product obtained in destructive distillation of bituminous coal; if its fumes are inhaled or if it is ingested in its natural state, it is toxic and carcinogenic. A preparation is used in ointment or solution in treatment of eczema and psoriasis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

TAR

Acronym for thrombocytopenia and absent radius. See: thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome.

tar

(tahr),
A thick, semisolid, blackish brown mass, of complex hydrocarbon composition, obtained by destructive distillation of carbonaceous materials. For individual tars, see specific names.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tar

(tär)
n.
1. A dark, oily, viscous material, consisting mainly of hydrocarbons, produced by the destructive distillation of organic substances such as wood, coal, or peat.
2. See coal tar.
3. A solid residue of tobacco smoke containing byproducts of combustion.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

TAR

Abbreviation for thrombocytopenia and absent radius.
See: thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A residual gas analyzer (RGA) was used to study the quantification of hydrocarbon decomposition from the oil spill soil samples, tarmat and tarball by employing Autosorb iQ (Quantachrome Instruments) coupled with Pfeiffer quadruple mass spectrometer.
The FTIR profiles in lower wavenumber regions (600-800 [cm.sup.-1]) of soil sediments such as tarmat, tarball, and plain beach sand at three stages (a) pre-heat, (b) post-heat and (c) DCM extraction are depicted in Fig.
4 shows the FTIR spectra (2800-3100 cm"1) of tarmat and tarball samples.
The tarmat and tarball samples obtained from the GOM shorelines (see Figure 1) have been investigated for the quantification of hydrocarbon gases during the thermal decomposition under helium ambient.
In this present investigation, we have extensively used the synergistic tools of FTIR and RGA to characterize the soils and sediments (tarmat and tarball) and to understand the chemical bonding and residual gas analysis during the pre-, post- and DCM- treatments.