tarantula

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Related to Tarantula spider: Tarantula hawk, Black widow spider

tarantula

 [tah-ran´tu-lah]
a large hairy venomous spider; although its bite is painful, it is seldom dangerous. See also spider bite.

ta·ran·tu·la

(tă-ran'chū-lă),
A large, hairy spider, considered highly venomous and often greatly feared; the bite, however, is usually no more harmful than a bee sting, and the creature is relatively inoffensive. See: tarantism.

tarantula

/ta·ran·tu·la/ (tah-ran´chu-lah) a venomous spider whose bite causes local inflammation and pain, usually not to a severe extent, including Eurypelma hentzii (American t.), Sericopelma communis (black t.) of Panama, and Lycosa tarentula (European wolf spider).

tarantula

(tə-răn′chə-lə)
n. pl. tarantu·las or tarantu·lae (-lē′)
1. Any of various large hairy spiders chiefly of the family Theraphosidae, capable of inflicting a bite that is painful but usually not dangerous to humans.
2. A large wolf spider (Lycosa tarentula) of southern Europe, once thought to cause tarantism.

tarantula

[təran′chələ]
a popular name for any of a number of species of large, hairy spiders. Although potentially poisonous, most are relatively harmless to humans. A bite by some species may produce an area of superficial skin destruction and may cause allergic reaction.
Entomology A large hairy spider, mostly of the family Theraphosidae. Their leg hair causes irritation and rashes; the bite of the Peruvian tarantula, Glyptocranium gasteracanthoides, is poisonous and may cause local ischaemia and gangrene, and evoke haematuria. See Arachnid injuries
Homeopathy A remedy prepared from tarantula parts, used for mental and physical hyperactivity, respiratory complaints, headaches, cardiovascular disease, anginal pain See Homeopathy
Vox populi Tarantulas can be kept as pets.

Tarantula

Lycosa tarantula, wolf spider Entomology A popular, much maligned and relatively harmless Grade B Movie prop. See Arachnid injuries.

ta·ran·tu·la

(tăr-an'chū-lă)
A large, hairy spider, considered highly venomous and often greatly feared; in fact, however, the bite is usually no more harmful than a bee sting.

tarantula

References in periodicals archive ?
Aspects of the natural history and behavioral ecology of the tarantula spider Aphonopelma henezi (Girard 1854) (urthognatha, Theraphosidae).
Tarantula spiders of the genus Brachypelma Simon 1891 are the only complete genus of arachnids protected from international trade under CITES law.
Among his current residents are three foxes, hens, a deer and, in a newly-built reptile house, two boa constricters, two tarantula spiders and a bearded dragon from Australia.
In fact, the last time she moved house she needed a spare room just to accommodate her beloved pets - some 40 tarantula spiders.
However, it has been suggested that alternative sources of nuclear genes could be used to enhance the characterization of population structure in tarantula spiders.
Sparse food could favor the evolution of cannibalism in the Lycosa tarantula spiders, Moya-Larano says.
The RSPCA rounded up around 100 animals, including dogs, cats, gerbils, ferrets, tortoises, tarantula spiders and one fish.
In southern Texas (Hidalgo County), two species of tarantula spiders are found where P.
Dave Griffin, 37, runs a thriving business using snakes, lizards and Tarantula spiders to spice up even the dullest party.
Dallas area science teachers will be up-close and in-person with baby alligators, snakes, tarantula spiders, scorpions, skunks, and bio artifacts that date back 80,000 years.
Stef brought along mice, rabbits, land snails, cockroaches, snakes, tarantula spiders and an owl.
Apart from centipedes and millipedes capable of delivering a nasty bite, the pest population includes deadly black widow and tarantula spiders.