acquisition

(redirected from Takeovers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to Takeovers: Hostile takeovers

ac·qui·si·tion

(ak'wi-zi'shŭn),
In psychology, the empiric demonstration of an increase in the strength of the conditioned response in successive trials of pairing the conditioned and unconditioned stimuli.

acquisition

An MRI term for the process of measuring and storing image data.

Acquisition

Imaging The obtention of an image of a dynamic process or flow through a vascular lumen.
Psychology In conditioning, forming associations in first learning a task.
Purchasing The process of getting what the government needs, to where it is needed, when it is needed, as economically as possible, and in compliance with legal and administrative requirements.

acquisition

Imaging The obtaining of an image of a dynamic process or flow through a vascular lumen. See Real-time imaging.

ac·qui·si·tion

(ak-wi-zish'ŭn)
psychology the empiric demonstration of an increase in the strength of the conditioned response in successive trials of pairing the conditioned and unconditioned stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
The High Court ruling related to the reimbursement of expenses related to the unsuccessful partial takeover attempt of Abano Healthcare by Healthcare Partners.
Prior to the vote, Shell completed its PS36bn takeover of BG.
If the takeover fails the FIE then the Independent Panel would inform the Secretary of State for Business who can then block it.
The data, from 387 organisations including many major UK brands, found that identity crime and facility takeover remains the biggest threat, making up 60% of fraud.
The Rules recognise that takeover rumours affect the share price of an offeree.
Eventually, new cases and enrollments will be harder to come by and takeovers will become more common for all brokers.
It is stable shareholders that support a corporation in situations such as shareholder meetings and hostile takeovers. Stable shareholders are made up of a combination of various stakeholders such as counterparty parent or affiliate companies main banks customers employees and life insurance companies.
Three main factors suggest that analyzing target returns in the 10 months prior to delisting to measure the impact of takeovers is conservative.
A key mistake came in the early 2000s under the Labour government's Competition Act, which critically removed the public interest test from examining such takeovers (except in relation to defence and the media).
A raft of changes to UK takeover rules has been put forward as part of a so-called "Cadbury Law" following the famed chocolate firm's controversial takeover by the US food giant.
The executives back the introduction of a so-called "Cadbury s Law," with measures such as increasing the minimum level of shareholder support needed to approve a deal, or allowing only long-terms shareholders to vote on takeovers.