Takayasu arteritis


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Ta·ka·ya·su ar·te·ri·tis

(tah-kah-yah'sū), [MIM*207600]
a progressive obliterative arteritis of unknown origin involving chronic inflammation of the aortic arch with fibrosis and marked luminal narrowing that affects the aorta and its branches, often with complete or near complete occlusion of segments of the aorta; more common in females.
See also: aortic arch syndrome.

Takayasu arteritis

or

Takayasu disease

(tăk′ə-yăs′o͞o, tä′kə-yä′so͞o)
n.
A progressive inflammatory disease that causes the arteries arising from the aortic arch to collapse, making it impossible to detect a pulse in the arms and neck, and resulting in a variety of symptoms associated with ischemia, such as temporary loss of consciousness and blindness.

Ta·ka·ya·su ar·te·ri·tis

(tah-kah-yah'sū ahr'tĕr-ī'tis)
A progressive obliterative arteritis of unknown origin involving fibrosis and luminal narrowing that affects the aorta and its branches; more common in females.
Synonym(s): aortic arch syndrome, Martorell syndrome, pulseless disease.

Takayasu arteritis

(ta?ka-ya'soo)
[Michishige Takayasu, Japanese physician, 1872–1938]
A rare vasculitis of the aorta and its branches, marked by inflammatory changes in the large arteries. Blood flow through those arteries is limited, esp. to the arms or head of affected persons. The disease, which is found most often in young women of Japanese descent, produces symptoms such as dizziness or arm claudication. Affected individuals usually have markedly reduced blood pressures or pulses in one or both arms.
Synonym: pulseless disease
References in periodicals archive ?
(4) in diagnosing Takayasu arteritis consists of three major criteria, including the left and right mid-sub-clavian artery lesions and characteristic signs and symptoms lasting for at least 1 month and 10 minor criteria: a high ESR, carotid artery tenderness, hypertension, aortic regurgitation or annuloaortic ectasia, pulmonary artery lesion, left mid-common carotid lesion, distal brachiocephalic trunk lesion, descending thoracic aorta lesion, abdominal aorta lesion, and coronary artery lesion.
Bilateral OIS is more common found in patients with the aortic arch syndrome, hyperhomocysteinemia, and Takayasu arteritis [11-13].
Bhan, "Takayasu arteritis presenting with malignant hypertension; a rare manifestation of a rare disease: a case report and review of the literature," Tropical Doctor, vol.
Effects of glucocorticoids and tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors on both clinical and molecular parameters in patients with Takayasu arteritis. J Pharmacol Pharmacother.
Cerebrovascular manifestations of Takayasu arteritis in Europe.
Clinical history, imaging findings, and laboratory abnormalities were attributed to Takayasu Arteritis. The patient was initially treated with several doses of pulse dose steroids, biologic therapy, and continued on steroid therapy and methotrexate.
Takayasu arteritis (TA) is a rare systemic vasculitis characterized by nonspecific inflammation of the aorta and its major branches such as the carotid artery, the subclavian artery, the pulmonary artery, and the coronary artery.[sup][1] The inflammation starts from the adventitia and progresses to the intima and leads to segmental stenosis, occlusion, dilatation, and/or aneurysm formation.[sup][2] The disease is most prevalent in East Asia, India, Turkey, and Mexico.
(5.) Numano F, The story of Takayasu arteritis, Rheumatol.
Initial pulmonary artery involvement in Takayasu arteritis. Radiology 1986; 159:401-3.
These classification criteria were developed for HSP, childhood polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), Takayasu arteritis (TA) and granulomatous polyarteritis (GPA).
Takayasu arteritis most often occurs in women between the ages of 15 and 45 years, whereas giant cell arteritis is most commonly diagnosed in patients older than 50 years.
The story of Takayasu arteritis. Rheumatology (Oxford).