feedback

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feedback

 [fēd´bak]
the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process. Feedback controls are a type of self-regulating mechanism by which certain activities are sustained within prescribed ranges. For example, the serum concentration of oxygen is affected in part by the rate and depth of respirations and is, therefore, an output of the respiratory system. If the concentration of oxygen drops below normal, this information is transmitted as input to the respiratory control center. The control center is thereby stimulated to increase the rate of respirations in order to return the oxygen concentration in the blood to within normal range.

This series of events is an example of negative feedback, which always causes the controller to respond in a manner that opposes a deviation from the normal level (setpoint). It is, therefore, a corrective action that returns a factor within the system to a normal range. Positive feedback tends to increase a deviation from the setpoint. In other words, positive feedback reinforces and accelerates either an excess or deficit of a factor within the system. See also homeostasis.
Physiologic example of negative feedback. From Applegate, 2000.
alpha feedback alpha biofeedback.

feed·back

(fēd'bak),
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism; for example, regulation of a furnace by a thermostat.
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.

feedback

/feed·back/ (fēd´bak) the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process; feedback is negative when the return exerts an inhibitory control, positive when it exerts a stimulatory effect.

feedback

(fēd′băk′)
n.
1.
a. The return of a portion of the output of a process or system to the input, especially when used to maintain performance or to control a system or process.
b. The portion of the output so returned.
c. Sound created when a transducer, such as a microphone or the pickup of an electric guitar, picks up sound from a speaker connected to an amplifier and regenerates it back through the amplifier.
2. The return of information about the result of a process or activity; evaluative response: asked the students for feedback on the new curriculum.
3. The process by which a system, often biological or ecological, is modulated, controlled, or changed by the product, output, or response it produces.

feedback

Etymology: AS, faedan + baec
, (in communication theory)
1 information produced by a receiver and perceived by a sender that informs the sender of the receiver's reaction to the message. Feedback is a cyclic part of the process of communication that regulates and modifies the content of messages.
2 the return of some of the output so as to exert some control in the process.

feed·back

(fēd'bak)
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism (e.g., regulation of a furnace by a thermostat).
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.
See: biofeedback

feedback

A feature of biological and other control systems in which some of the information from the output is returned to the input to exert either a potentiating effect (positive feedback) or a dampening and regularizing effect (negative feedback). Too much positive feedback produces a runaway effect often with oscillation.

feedback

regulatory mechanisms in which the outcome of system activity governs the amount of further output from the system; e.g. modulation of motor activity by sensory stimuli triggered by muscle contractions

feed·back

(fēd'bak)
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism; e.g., regulation of a furnace by a thermostat.
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.
See: biofeedback

feedback,

n the constant flow of sensory information back to the brain. When feedback mechanisms are deficient because of sensory deprivation, motor function becomes distorted, aberrant, and uncoordinated.

feedback

the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process.
Feedback controls are a type of self-regulating mechanism by which certain activities are sustained within prescribed ranges. For example, the serum concentration of oxygen is affected in part by the rate and depth of respirations and is, therefore, an output of the respiratory system. If the concentration of oxygen drops below normal, this information is transmitted as input to the respiratory control center. The control center is thereby stimulated to increase the rate of respirations in order to return the oxygen concentration in the blood to within normal range.
This series of events is an example of negative feedback, which always causes the controller to respond in a manner that opposes a deviation from the normal level (setpoint). It is, therefore, a corrective action that returns a factor within the system to a normal range. Positive feedback tends to increase a deviation from the setpoint. In other words, positive feedback reinforces and accelerates either an excess or deficit of a factor within the system. See also homeostasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
This condition was introduced to explore the ability of tactile feedback to support both early and later stages of processing (i.
Tactile feedback in touchscreens would be most useful in self-service applications and those that require enhanced accuracy, safety or a more refined user interface.
Tactile feedback has been shown to, not only increase productivity and make products easier to use, but to also make the user experience much more satisfying.
To help develop the tactile feedback aspect of iDrive, BMW turned to Immersion Corp.
Then, once tactile-feedback zones are created to correspond with existing on-screen touch buttons, players can experience tactile feedback with their favorite games.
When depressed, the dome closes and makes electrical contact while providing a tactile feedback to the user.
These two-handed devices typically use a screw-auger type plunger to generate pressure and do not provide the clinician with tactile feedback for the injection.
WT-Series domes can be used anywhere a momentary switch, with tactile feedback, is required.
This surface-mount, three-way B6J jog lever switch offers confirming tactile feedback in all three directions--scroll up, scroll down, and select.
com/corporate/), announces that a new licensee, CTT-Net of Korea, is launching the world's first personal navigation devices (PNDs) that use Immersion's TouchSense([R]) technology to provide tactile feedback for touchscreen interactions.
It incorporates short-travel mechanical switches with a lifetime of over three million cycles which are said to provide exceptional positive tactile feedback.
Providing audible and tactile feedback, the units promise smooth and responsive operation.