tachypnea


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tachypnea

 [tak″ip-ne´ah]
very rapid respirations, seen especially in high fever when the body attempts to rid itself of excess heat. The rate of respiration increases at a ratio of about eight breaths per minute for every degree Celsius above normal. Other causes include pneumonia, compensatory respiratory alkalosis as the body tries to “blow off” excess carbon dioxide, respiratory insufficiency, lesions in the respiratory control center of the brain, and salicylate poisoning. See also hyperpnea and hyperventilation.
transient tachypnea of the newborn a self-limited elevation of the respiratory rate in newborns due to delayed clearing of fetal lung water.

tach·yp·ne·a

(tak-ip-nē'ă), In the diphthong pn, the p is silent only at the beginning of a word. Although tachypne'a is the correct pronunciation, the alternative pronunciation tachyp'nea is widespread in the U.S.
Rapid breathing.
Synonym(s): polypnea
[tachy- + G. pnoē (pnoiē), breathing]

tachypnea

/tach·yp·nea/ (tak″ip-ne´ah) very rapid respiration.

tachypnea

(tăk′ĭp-nē′ə, tăk′ĭ-nē′ə)
n.
Rapid breathing.

tach′yp·ne′ic adj.

tachypnea

[tak′ēpnē′ə]
Etymology: Gk, tachys + pnoia, breathing
an abnormally rapid rate of breathing (more than 20 breaths per minute in adults), such as seen with hyperpyrexia. Also spelled tachypnoea.

tachypnea

Medtalk Abnormally fast breathing. Cf Dyspnea.

tach·y·pne·a

(tak'ip-nē'ă)
Rapid breathing (i.e., 20 breaths/min).
Synonym(s): polypnea, tachypnoea.
[tachy- + G. pnoē (pnoiē), breathing]

tachypnea (takˈ·ip·nēˑ·),

n abnormally rapid rate of breathing, such as that associated with high fever.

tach·y·pne·a

(tak'ip-nē'ă)
Rapid breathing.
[tachy- + G. pnoē (pnoiē), breathing]

tachypnea

very rapid respirations. The rate is fast and the depth shallow, as in heat stroke, because the initiating mechanism is hyperthermia and there is no hypercapnia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Subjects were assigned randomly to one of two groups: the bradypnea cohort (Group 1) or the tachypnea cohort (Group 2).
Satar M, Taskin E, Ozlu FTuli A, Ozcan K, Yildizdas HY Polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in transient tachypnea of neonate and respiratory distress syndrome.
In such cases, the general symptoms are abdominal pain, abdominal distension, rectorrhagia, tachypnea, and tachycardia.
Also, patients with RSV were more likely to present tachypnea and cough, whereas patients with HBoV were more likely to have high fever and leukocytosis (Table 3).
While more recent results from studies suggest that risk for PPHN following SSRI use during pregnancy is far less than originally estimated, results in the literature consistently indicate that about 25%-30% of infants exposed to SSRIs late in pregnancy manifest symptoms of this transient jitteriness and "poor neonatal adaptation," with associated symptoms of restlessness, myoclonus, and tachypnea.
Univariate analysis showed that presence of high-risk medical conditions, age <5 years, dyspnea, and findings of tachypnea, hypoxia (Sp[O.
chest pain, tachypnea, or pulse oximetry <95% for P[O.
He also developed tachycardia, tachypnea, and wet crepitations, as well as elevations in liver enzyme and eosinophilia levels.
Specific to the respiratory system they cover such topics as apnea of prematurity, asthma basics, asthma and teens, BPD, cystic fibrosis, cystic fibrosis and nutrition, managing asthma, meconium aspiration, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), and transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN).