thiazolidinedione

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gli·ta·zone

(glit-ah'zōn),
Shorthand term for a class of oral hypoglycemics that have glitazone as a component in their names.
Synonym(s): thiazolidinedione

thiazolidinedione

(thī′ə-zō′lĭ-dēn′dĭ-ōn′)
n.
Any of a class of drugs that decrease insulin resistance and are used to treat type 2 diabetes.

thiazolidinedione

Glitazone, TZD Endocrinology A class of oral antidiabetic agents that inhibit tyrosine kinase, ↓ insulin resistance and correct hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia Adverse effects Hepatic dysfunction. See Troglitazone, Tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

thiazolidinedione

(thī′ă-zŏ″lĭ-dēn-dī-ŏn)
A class of oral hypoglycemic agents that lowers blood sugars by reducing insulin resistance (improving tissue sensitivity to the effects of insulin) in fat and muscle, as well as the liver. A commonly used agent in this class is pioglitazone.

CAUTION!

Side effects of medications in this class include increased fluid retention, fractures, heart failure, liver injury, and weight gain.
References in periodicals archive ?
TZDs have been in spotlight for safety concerns in terms of volume overload and congestive heart failure.
In TZD treatment group, the placebo effect led to a nonsignificant HbA1c change of 0.130% (95% CI , −0.174-0.433%; P = 0.402) in Caucasians as well as a nonsignificant HbA1c change of −0.036% (95% CI , −0.962-0.890%; P = 0.939) in Asians.
One study reported that lobeglitazone was mainly localized to the liver [13], suggesting that it could have potent effects for improving insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism in the liver compared to other TZDs. However, there is no clear evidence that lobeglitazone improved NAFLD through direct effects on the liver.
The thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- (PPAR-) [gamma], a nuclear transcription factor principally associated with insulin action, lipid and glucose metabolism, and energy homeostasis [2, 3].
Interesting alteration in structure of TZD was to insert a huge lipophilic ring like dibenzpyryl (41) with an unsaturated linker L2.
To check whether this instrument was random with respect to patient characteristics, Prentice and colleagues performed a simple falsification test by comparing sample means between SU and TZD initiators (columns 1 and 2 of Table 1), and then between those paired with high versus low SU prescribers (columns 3 and 4 of Table 1).
The final PK model of TZD (a 2-compartment model with sigmoidal absorption, absolute bioavailability, and linear elimination), was used to estimate TZD exposure measures for each patient based on measured concentrations and statistically significant predictors (IBW and total bilirubin), including the area under the concentration-time curve at 0-24h ([AUC.sub.0-24h]), minimum drug concentration ([C.sub.min]), and maximum drug concentration ([C.sub.max]) on Day 1 and at steadystate.
Diano further said that their study suggested that the increased weight gain in diabetic patients treated with TZD could be due to the effect of this drug in the brain, therefore, targeting peripheral PPARgamma to treat type 2 diabetes should be done by developing TZD compounds that could not break in the brain.
A clinical trial with 233 T2DM patients has been reported to access the effects of combination therapy with TZD and exenatide.
However, safety concerns due to side effects of TZD based on increased risk of cardiovascular disorders have led to a tightly restricted access of these drugs in the United States and a recommendation for market withdrawal in Europe.
A retrospective study of nearly 15,000 adults aged 55 years and older who started on single-agent drug therapy for type 2 diabetes between 1999 and 2001 showed that 5 years after starting therapy, patients who started on metformin had a 23% lower 5-year risk for dementia, compared with patients who started on a thiazolidinedione (TZD) such as rosiglitazone (Avandia), reported Rachel Whitmer, Ph.D., an investigator in the research division of Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland.