TULIP


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TULIP

TULIP

Transurethral laser-induced prostatectomy, see there.

incision

(in-sizh'on) [L. incisio, a cut]
A cut made with a knife, electrosurgical unit, or laser, esp. for surgical purposes.

coronal incision

1. An incision made across the scalp in a plane that separates the front (anterior portion) of the head from the back (posterior portion).
2. A crown-shaped incision.

limbal relaxing incision

Abbreviation: LRI
A surgical treatment for astigmatism in which the cornea is reshaped by placing small cuts in its periphery (the limbus of the cornea). These incisions make the misshapen cornea more spherical, which improves visual clarity.

McBurney incision

See: McBurney, Charles

paramedian incision

A surgical incision, esp. of the abdominal wall, close to the midline.

Pfannenstiel incision

See: Pfannenstiel incision

relaxing incision

A second incision made during surgery to promote drainage, relieve the tension on a wound as it is sutured, or facilitate mobilization of a sliding tissue flap.
Synonym: counterincision; counteropening.

transurethral laser incision of the prostate

Abbreviation: TULIP
The treatment of prostatic hyperplasia with a laser used as a cutting instrument. The laser is inserted into the penile urethra and directed at the diseased portion of the gland.

transurethral laser incision of the prostate

Abbreviation: TULIP
The treatment of prostatic hyperplasia with a laser used as a cutting instrument. The laser is inserted into the penile urethra and directed at the diseased portion of the gland.
See also: incision

tulip

the horticultural tulip—see tulipa. For Cape and Natal tulip see homeria.
References in classic literature ?
At last he had even started amongst all the Linnaeuses and Tourneforts a tulip which bore his name, and which, after having travelled all through France, had found its way into Spain, and penetrated as far as Portugal; and the King, Don Alfonso VI.
Mynheer van Baerle was a painter, as Mynheer Boxtel was a tulip-grower; he wanted somewhat more sun for his paintings, and he took half a degree from his neighbour's tulips.
What was the agony of the unfortunate Boxtel on seeing the windows of the new story set out with bulbs and seedlings of tulips for the border, and tulips in pots; in short, with everything pertaining to the pursuits of a tulip-monomaniac!
Boxtel at once pictured to himself this learned man, with a capital of four hundred thousand and a yearly income of ten thousand guilders, devoting all his intellectual and financial resources to the cultivation of the tulip.
And now if Van Baerle produced a new tulip, and named it the John de Witt, after having named one the Cornelius?
His exertions, indeed, were crowned with a most magnificent result: he produced three new tulips, which he called the "Jane," after his mother; the "Van Baerle," after his father; and the "Cornelius," after his godfather; the other names have escaped us, but the fanciers will be sure to find them in the catalogues of the times.
In the same degree as Cornelius de Witt had excited the hatred of the people by sowing those evil seeds which are called political passions, Van Baerle had gained the affections of his fellow citizens by completely shunning the pursuit of politics, absorbed as he was in the peaceful pursuit of cultivating tulips.
Besides, Isaac had made the discovery that too much sun was injurious to tulips, and that this flower grew quicker, and had a better colouring, with the temperate warmth of morning, than with the powerful heat of the midday sun.
There were bundles of labels, cupboards, and drawers with compartments, and wire guards for the cupboards, to allow free access to the air whilst keeping out slugs, mice, dormice, and rats, all of them very curious fanciers of tulips at two thousand francs a bulb.
And thus it was not for the sake of painted tulips, but for real ones, that Van Baerle took from him half a degree of warmth.
The apparent irrelevance of this statement made me weep still louder, the bitter tears of insulted sorrow; but he stuck to his point, and harangued me from the path, explaining the connection between north walls and tulips and blood and stones till my tears all dried up again and I listened attentively, for the conclusion to be drawn from his remarks was plainly that I had been shamefully taken in by the head gardener, who was an unprincipled person thenceforward to be for ever mistrusted and shunned.
There stood white lilies with blood-red stamina, skyblue tulips, which shone as they waved in the winds, and apple-trees, the apples of which looked exactly like large soapbubbles: so only think how the trees must have sparkled in the sunshine