TRPM8


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TRPM8

A gene on chromosome 2q37.1 that encodes a receptor-activated, nonselective cation channel involved in detecting of sensations (e.g., low temperatures, when it is activated by temperature < 25ºC). TRPM8 is activated by icilin, eucalyptol, menthol, cold and modulation of intracellular pH.
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In prior work, McKemy discovered a link between the experience of cold and a protein known as TRPM8 (pronounced trip-em-ate), which a sensor of cold temperatures in neurons in the skin, as well as a receptor for menthol, the cooling component of mint.
In prior work, David McKemy, associate professor of neurobiology in the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, discovered a link between the experience of cold and a protein known as TRPM8 (pronounced trip-em-ate), which a sensor of cold temperatures in neurons in the skin, as well as a receptor for menthol, the cooling component of mint.
Just as TRPV1 activates cough, TRPM8 can suppress it.
alpha]-sanshool may be mediated by different ion-channel receptors on different types of sensoiy neurons, like the capsaicin (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1)), TRPA1, TRPM8 receptor, while more recently, emphasis is placed on distinct receptors like KCNK3, KCNK 9 and KCNK 18 (two-pore potassium channels) (Bautista et al.
Urothelium also expresses a host of other metabotropic and ionotropic receptors such as TRPV1 and TRPM8, whose functional role is yet to be confirmed.
Two of them, known as PRDM16 and TRPM8, were specific to migraines, as opposed to other kinds of headaches.
Following a similar paradigm, Professor Julius' research showed that a menthol receptor from primary sensory neurons is activated by cold thermal stimuli, and that the structure of this menthol/cold receptor, TRPM8, resembles that of TRPV1.
The menthol receptor TRPM8 is the principal detector of environmental cold.
Of related interest is the identification of another member of the transient receptor potential family, TRPM8 [de la Pena et al.
Their research focuses on the TRPM8 (transient receptor potential melastatin-8 channel) receptor, a protein responsible for the sensation of feeling cold, and on M8-B, a drug that acts as a TRPM8 antagonist.
Studies of the lower urinary tract have indicated that several TRP channels, including TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM8 and TRPA1, are expressed in the bladder and may act as sensors of stretch and/or chemical irritation.