TRAPS


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TRAPS

 

TRAPS

Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor associated periodic syndrome; constellation of disease characterized by prolonged attacks of high fever and severe localized inflammation.

TRAPS

abbreviation for tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome. See familial periodic fever.

periodic fever, familial, autosomal dominant

A hereditary periodic fever syndrome (OMIM:142680) characterised by recurrent fever, abdominal pain, localised tender skin lesions and myalgia. The main complication is amyloidosis, which occurs in 25% of cases.
 
Molecular pathology
Caused by defects of TNFRSF1A, which encodes a major receptor for TNF-alpha that activates NF-kappaB, mediates apoptosis and regulates inflammation.

traps

devices for the trapping of wild animals. Mostly used with an attractant, varying with the target species. Once in the target area the trap is sprung. The trap may be a limb snare, frowned on in many circles now, a cage with a dropdown door, a net dropped from above or fired from a gun, a sticky surface, a funneled entrance to a cage and so on.
References in classic literature ?
So I put up a yarn about a wager we had made about this very trap of Maguire's.
I told them to bring the trap round; or would you rather walk?
No, we'd better drive," said Stepan Arkadyevitch, getting into the trap.
In 2013, we evaluated various traps consisting of 3 basic types (i.
The traps can be operated legally by people who abide by the conditions of a general licence issued by Natural England.
With only the inappropriate traps they're allowed, local trappers can't help control this species.
They were met with incredulity, constrained outrage and hard questions from diverse individuals, most of whom had fought for decades to ban fish traps in the Gulf, which culminated at the end of 2007.
Few studies on the ghost fishing of lost traps have been carried out in European waters, and there has been no information from southern European waters.
For example: the use of nets and sticky traps to measure aerial density at one or more altitudes (Greenstone et al.
Live traps are commonly used to estimate small mammal abundance and diversity (for example, Von Trebra and others 1998; Carey and Wilson 2001).
fishery uses 13 times as many traps as the Canadians do, the researchers say.