TRAM flap


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transverse rectus abdominus musculocutaneous flap

musculocutaneous flap, based inferiorly or (more commonly) superiorly on the deep inferior epigastric or superior epigastric (respectively) arteries that supply the rectus abdominus muscle. Most commonly used to close defects of the trunk or (most commonly) for breast reconstruction. Originated and pioneered by C.R. Hartrampf.
Synonym(s): TRAM flap

TRAM flap

an autogenous myocutaneous flap that uses transverse rectus abdominal muscle (TRAM) to carry lower abdominal skin and fat to the breast for reconstruction. See also myocutaneous flap.
Transverse Rectus Abdominus Myocutaneous Flap. A tissue flap procedure that uses muscle, fat and skin from the abdomen to create a new breast mound after a mastectomy, either as a free—detached—or as a pedicle—attached to its blood supply and tunneled—tissue flap

TRAM flap

Transverse rectus abdominus musculocutaneous flap General surgery A rotated piece of tissue used as an alternative to a prosthesis in post-radical mastectomy reconstructive breast surgery; the operating time and the recovery period is longer, but the cosmetic result is often better

TRAM flap

Abbrev. for transverse rectus abdominis mycocutaneous flap. This is a layered piece of tissue, consisting of skin, muscle, and fat, taken from the abdomen of a woman and used in the reconstruction of her breast after mastectomy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abdominal wall strength, bulging, and hernia after TRAM flap breast reconstruction.
This flap is also a good option for thin women who do not have sufficient abdominal tissue to achieve the TRAM flap, but usually requires implant placement in addition to the autologous tissue (8).
During a TRAM flap, the surgeon removes the tissue, fat and the muscle to preserve the major blood supply that runs through the muscle for use in the new breast.
The report summed up: "The conclusion is that the magnitude and duration of the reconstruction by a tram flap directly contributed to the stroke.
It is important to note that the TRAM flap operation can be done only once.
Mrs Price, aged 41, from Woodgate Valley, had a mastectomy at the hospital in 1986 and was told two years later she could undergo reconstruction surgery using the so-called TRAM flap procedure where excess skin, muscle and fat from her stomach wouldbe u sed to rebuild her breast.
In total, 199 patients underwent 232 pedicled TRAM flap reconstructions.
Newer versions of the TRAM flap preserve the abdominal muscle, but they require greater surgical skill and may have a higher complication rate.
More specific applications include: stoma reversal, paraesophageal/hiatal hernia repair, breast reconstruction using pedicled TRAM flap, abdominoperineal resection and abdominal wall reconstruction.
The product can be used in several indications, such as paraesophageal/hiatal hernia repair, abdominal wall reconstruction, abdominoperineal resection, stoma reversal and breast reconstruction using pedicled TRAM flap.
All patients in the study will undergo a TRAM Flap, a surgical method using the body's own tissues to reconstruct the breast following a mastectomy, and will receive an ON-Q pump.