TORCH syndrome

(redirected from TORCH infections)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

TORCH syn·drome

a group of infections, seen in neonates, which have crossed the placental barrier with similar clinical manifestations, although symptoms may vary in degree and time of appearance: toxoplasmosis, other infections, rubella, cytomegalovirus infection, and herpes simplex.
See also: STORCH.

TORCH syn·drome

a group of infections, seen in neonates, which have crossed the placental barrier with similar clinical manifestations, although symptoms may vary in degree and time of appearance: toxoplasmosis, other infections, rubella, cytomegalovirus infection, and herpes simplex.
See also: STORCH.
References in periodicals archive ?
Majority of the TORCH infections cause mild maternal illness, but fetal consequences are serious.
Studies of Turbadkar et aI(7) on the seroprevalence of TORCH infections in 308 women with BOH in a general public hospital, Mumbai, over one-year period for IgM seropositivity to CMV by ELISA method observed the presence of IgM antibodies in 32 cases (8.42%) for CMV, which correlates with my study.
Differential diagnoses of congenital LCMV infection include testing for TORCH infections (Table).
STORCH was German for stork, which Fuerst believed to be "highly suitable." (24) The following year, Roger Brumback, MD, proposed another modification; he suggested that the term TORCHES (TOxoplasmosis, Rubella, Cytomegalovirus, HErpes, Syphilis) be used because pediatricians were already becoming familiar with the concept of TORCH infections. (25) Through the succeeding decades, increasing progress in the recognition and diagnosis of congenitally acquired infections has resulted in the O representing a number of Other infections.
(12) Disorders of calcium metabolism, such as hypoparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism, are important to exclude, as are prenatal TORCH infections that can produce similar imaging findings.
Investigation for TORCH infections showed positive only for rubella IgG antibody.
To control for other infections, mothers with other nosologies of TORCH infections were carefully selected, e.g.
The prenatal and perinatal infections, falling under the designation of TORCH complex (Nickerson et al., 2012) (also known as STORCH, TORCHES, or the TORCH infections), are a medical acronym for a set of perinatal infections (Maldonado et al., 2011), i.e., infections that are passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus.
The chapter 'Outcome of neonates born with congenital infections' covers TORCH infections quite comprehensively.
Congenital infections such as the TORCH infections (Toxoplasma gondii, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus) and others such as syphilis and varicella-zoster virus, may cause congenital malformations and multiorgan involvement frequently associated with long-term neurologic injury.
Among these 53 patients 11 suffered from HIE, 7 each had idiopathic aqueductal stenosis and intracranial tumours, 2 each with Dandy-Walker spectrum, infarcts and TORCH infections. There were 3 more cases, each afflicted from partial agenesis of corpus callosum, granuloma and associated myelomeningocele respectively.