tonic

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Related to TONICS: tonic water

tonic

 [ton´ik]
1. producing and restoring normal tone.
2. characterized by continuous tension.

ton·ic

(ton'ik),
1. In a state of continuous unremitting action; denoting especially a prolonged muscular contraction.
2. Invigorating; increasing physical or mental tone or strength.
3. A remedy purported to restore enfeebled function and promote vigor and a sense of well-being; tonics are qualified, according to the organ or system on which they are presumed to act, as cardiac, digestive, hematic, vascular, nerve, uterine, general, etc.
[G. tonikos, fr. tonos, tone]

tonic

(tŏn′ĭk)
n.
a. An agent, such as a medication, that is supposed to restore or improve health or well-being.
b. A liquid preparation for the scalp or hair.
adj.
1. Restorative or stimulating to health or well-being.
2.
a. Physiology Of, relating to, or producing tone or tonicity in muscles or tissue: a tonic reflex.
b. Medicine Characterized by continuous tension or contraction of muscles: a tonic convulsion or spasm.

ton′i·cal·ly adv.
A generic term for a carbonated beverage—commonly called ‘soda’ or ‘pop’—either artificially sweetened with saccharin or aspartame—average < 5 calories—or glucose, fructose—average 170 calories—purchased in cans or bottles or served from a tap
Adverse effects on health—peer-reviewed data: Carbonation is associated with dental erosion, osteoporosis, increased risk of fractures, and kidney stones; the sweeteners are linked to obesity and increased risk of type 2 diabetes

tonic

Alternative medicine A medicinal preparation, usually of herbal origin–eg, ginseng, used in traditional Chinese and in ayurvedic medicine; tonics are said to be help build vital energy–qi. See Hoxsey tonic. Cf Bitter.

ton·ic

(ton'ik)
1. In a state of continuous unremitting action; denoting especially a muscular contraction.
2. Invigorating; increasing physical or mental tone or strength.
3. A remedy purported to restore enfeebled function and promote vigor and a sense of well-being, qualified, according to the organ or system on which it is presumed to act, as cardiac, digestive, hematic, vascular, nervine, uterine, general, and others.
[G. tonikos, fr. tonos, tone]

tonic

1. Of continuous activity.
2. A mythical remedy commonly prescribed by doctors as a PLACEBO.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lixir Tonic has been supported on its export journey byNewcastle-based International Trade Advisers as part of the Food is GREAT campaign, a cross-departmental initiative by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and the Department for International Trade (DIT).
mc But if you get to the Galgorm before me, I'd hold the tonic and get the credit card out.
Early recipe development in the home kitchen produced three of the tonic recipes, and they quickly realised they would need more professional support.
Sheila Williamson, 73, of East Kilbride, gave a tonic to all four of her children when the seasons changed from autumn into winter and also from winter into spring.
The Valencian Orange Tonic Water is available in Newcastle bars including Babucho and Head of Steam, By the River Brew in Gateshead as well as at department store Fenwick and the Spanish City in Whitley Bay.
Jackie Wade, Newcastle University business adviser, said: "It's been a real pleasure working with two inspirational graduate entrepreneurs, who have shown real passion and tenacity in turning their business idea into an exciting new tonic product range.
We're especially pleased about launching these artisan tonics to complement our gin range; here at Lidl UK we want to make sure our customers know we're the destination for true summer refreshment."
Gin and tonic was especially popular in colonial days, as quinine in tonic was believed to ward off malaria.
| Greenall's Wild Berry Gin (PS12, 70cl, Tesco) and Fever Tree Mediterranean Tonic (PS1.50, 50cl, Sainsbury's): Joanne Moore, master distiller, Greenall's, said: "Fever Tree Indian tonic is clean and fresh which, with Greenall's Wild Berry, allows the Scottish raspberries and blackberries through on the nose and taste."
The tonics rotate constantly, with flavors designed to meet seasonal attributes.
Medicinally, Raspberry leaf is used as a uterine tonic to tighten and tone the structure of the organ, while Hawthorn berries are used as a tonic to the heart and blood vessels.