TAS1R3

TAS1R3

A gene on chromosome 1p36.33 that encodes a G protein-coupled receptor which acts a putative taste receptor: TAS1R1/TAS1R3 responds to the umami taste stimulus (the taste of monosodium glutamate); TAS1R2/TAS1R3 recognises diverse natural and synthetic sweeteners.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Huang et al., "Tas1r3, encoding a new candidate taste receptor, is allelic to the sweet responsiveness locus Sac," Nature Genetics, vol.
In addition, low-calorie sweetener consumption was associated with up to 2.5-fold overexpression of the sweet taste receptor TAS1R3. Sweet taste receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that are present in taste buds and in other tissues, serving as carbohydrate sensors.
Yasue, "Genomic structure of swine taste receptor family 1 member 3, TAS1R3, and its expression in tissues," Cytogenetic and Genome Research, vol.
Zolotarev, "Impaired glucose metabolism in mice lacking the Tas1r3 taste receptor gene," PLoS ONE, vol.
Polymorphisms in the taste receptor gene (Tas1r3) region are associated with saccharin preference in 30 mouse strains.
Un ejemplo de esto es un ensayo que se realizo en celulas de ratones, en las que se aiteraron las secuencias de ADN y se genero un cambio del aminoacido isoleucina por el aminoacido treonina en la posicion 60 de la proteina TAS1R3. Este cambio origino la baja preferencia de los ratones a la sacarina (49-51).
As reported the critical proteins were TAS1R3, a component of both the sweet and umami (amino acid) taste receptors, and GNAT3, a molecule needed to convert the oral taste receptor signal into a nerve cell response.
In order to explore the reproductive function of the two proteins, the research team engineered mice that were missing genes for the mouse versions of TAS1R3 and GNAT3 but expressed the human form of the TAS1R3 receptor.
However, when the human TAS1R3 receptor was blocked in the engineered mice by adding the drug clofibrate to the rodents' diet, thus leaving the mice without any functional TAS1R3 or GNAT3 proteins, the males became sterile due to malformed and fewer sperm.
The researchers correlated the scores with variations in two sugar-sensing genes, TAS1R3 and TAS1R2, and found two variants just outside of the TAS1R3 gene that seemed to predict their volunteer's scores.
Drayna said that instead, the two variations near TAS1R3 probably determine how much of a receptor protein is produced by the taste buds.