T1 line


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T1 line

Telemedicine A data line that uses copper wires, transferring data at 1.5 Mb/sec. See ATM, Bandwidth, Bit, Byte, Codec, Ethernet, Modem, Telemedicine.
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"By installing a PowerLink WAN link controller, SMEs can replace a T1 line with two DSL lines, and save $7,205 per year in T1-associated costs even after fully accounting for the cost of the PowerLink.
The X-axis represents the number of T1 lines and the Y-axis represents the annual price of T1 line.
While 70GB of e-mail data and 2-3GB of document data changes every day, Thompson Hine has used the iPStor servers (not the host servers to manage replication, taking the load off of production servers and minimizing traffic on their T1 line.
If you use an Internet connection at a school or large business, you may have access to a T1 line. If so, your data path may be in the 700-1,500 kbps range in both directions.
Through fixed wireless technology, TeraGo offers high bandwidth and Internet services ranging from 1.5Mbps to 100Mbps - Internet speeds that are up to 45 times faster than business DSL or up to 65 times faster than a T1 line.
Kemp recommends that any business utilizing over six incoming lines install a T1 line. T1 (Tee-One), as defined by McGraw Hill's technology dictionary, is a standard 1.544-Mbps carrier system used to transport 24 telephone lines, or various broadband services, from one point to another.
Anybody got some spare time and a T1 line? It's time to rebuild our communities.
* T1 line. While it's fast (1.5 Mbps), it's also expensive: $800 a month for the transmission line and $200 a month for the ISP.
The Bundles offer a solution for smaller businesses that once found T1 access impractical for their business needs as they could not fully utilize capacity of that T1 line.
The end user, in turn, will receive nearly unlimited bandwidth at speeds as high as two Gbps, far greater than the maximum eight Mbps of DSL or the 1.5 Mbps of a standard T1 line. End users would be able to access the service simply by plugging into their electrical outlets, with a portable outlet connector that Stewart estimates will cost $60.
Both DSL and cable-modem technologies can offer the 1.5 Mbps rates that a business T1 line would deliver.
Company lawyer, Brandon Powell claims: "Our service is 30% less expensive than the same speeds over a fixed line as we don't have to lay cables in the streets." A wired T1 line in Salt Lake City costs approximately $800-$1,000 whereas the equivalent wireless access service from IJNT will cost $600.