Trypanosoma cruzi

(redirected from T. cruzi)

Try·pan·o·so·ma cru·zi

a species that causes South American trypanosomiasis and is endemic in Mexico and various countries of Central and South America; transmission and infection are common only where the triatomine bug vector defecates while taking blood, because the bug's feces contain the infective agents that are scratched into the skin or brought in contact with mucosal surfaces. Trypomastigotes are found in the blood, and amastigotes occur intracellularly in clusters or colonies in the tissues; heart muscle fibers and cells of many other organs are attacked, the organisms not being restricted to macrophages as in visceral leishmaniasis; humans, dogs, cats, house rats, armadillos, bats, certain monkeys, and opossums are the usual vertebrate hosts; vectors are members of the family Triatominae. Also known as Schizotrypanum cruzi, a distinct generic designation widely used in the endemic regions.

Try·pan·o·so·ma cru·zi

(trī-pan'ō-sō'mă krūz'ī)
A species of protozoan flagellates that causes South American trypanosomiasis; transmission and infection are common only where the triatomine bug vector defecates while taking blood, because the bug feces contain the infective agents that are scratched into the skin or brought in contact with mucosal surfaces. Trypomastigotes are found in the blood; heart muscle and other organs are attacked.

Trypanosoma cruzi

The causative agent of American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease). It is transmitted by triatomids (bloodsucking insects of the family Reduviidae).
See also: Trypanosoma
References in periodicals archive ?
En el laboratorio de Biologia de Vectores y Parasitos, Instituto de Zoologia y Ecologia Tropical; Universidad Central de Venezuela, se realizaron investigaciones sobre la relacion de T. cruzi con D.
Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a chronic systemic infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), an important public health problem in American continent.
Because of its natural life cycle, involving mitotic division in reduviid insects, which then transmit the infection by feeding on the blood of different vertebrates, T. cruzi is considered to be a severe health problem in rural areas of Mexico and Central and South America, where these insects are endemic.
Previously, it was demonstrated that transplantation of MSC into mice chronically infected with T. cruzi caused a reduction of myocarditis and modulation of fibrosis [14-16].
Several studies have been conducted to find new active compounds against T. cruzi. The search based on natural and synthetic compounds is promising, either alone or in combination, against the parasite [9-12].
Las formas mas conocidas de transmision de T. cruzi al hombre, incluyen la via vectorial, congenita, por lactancia, oral y transfusional (2).
Along this line, T. cruzi infection and endothelin-1 (ET-1) have been shown to cooperatively activate the [Ca.sup.2+]/NFAT cascade in cardiomyocytes, leading to cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2) induction and increased release of prostanoids and prohypertrophic peptides.
CDC recommends antitrypanosomal treatment for all cases of acute and congenital Chagas disease, reactivated infection, and chronic T. cruzi infection in individuals 18 years or younger.
Capacidade discriminatoria e acordo entre o ELISA-F29 e a PCR em individuos infectados com T. cruzi
Diferentes estudios han demostrado que diversos agentes infecciosos pueden interferir en la progresion del cancer; entre estos agentes se encuentra el parasito Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), cuya infeccion retrasa el desarrollo del tumor al presentar afinidad por las celulas cancerigenas (5).
The T. Cruzi parasite infects mammals, but matures into its transmittable stage within the small intestine of the Triatoma Infestans bug.