T-wave inversion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

T-wave inversion

In electrocardiography, the changing of the normal upright (convex) appearance of the ventricular repolarization to a concave tracing in which the concavity is depressed below the isoelectric line. T-wave inversion is often associated with ventricular hypertrophy, ventricular ectopic beats, and coronary ischemia, among other conditions.
See also: inversion
References in periodicals archive ?
of Patients 1 Pulmonary hypertension with 4 dilation of right atrium and right ventricle 2 Ventricular premature contraction in ECG 1 3 Left anterior hemiblock in ECG 1 4 T-wave inversion in ECG 1 5 Dilated cardiomyopathy 1 6 Trivial MR 3 7 Trivial TR 3 8 Pericardial effusion 1 Table 2.
Twelve leads surface ECG at admission showed sinus rhythm of 56/min, QRS axis of about +75[degrees], PR=160 ms, horizontal ST segment depression of 0.5-1 mm and T-wave inversion in inferior and lateral leads (Figure 1).
T-wave inversion is a particularly difficult conundrum in athletes as it may represent the only sign of an inherited heart muscle disease, even in the absence of any other features and before structural changes in the heart can be detected (15).
(2011) described specific T-wave inversion in anterior leads as a normal variant in certain population of Afro-Caribbean athletes.
A 19-year-old Chinese female student was referred to our institution for abnormal T-wave inversions on the precordial leads of a screening electrocardiogram (ECG) (Figure 1), as well as a chest X-ray (CXR) showing cardiomegaly (Figure 2).
Conclusion: The classical pattern of biphasic T-wave inversion on electrocardiogram was seen associated with stenosis in the proximal as well as middle part of the left anterior descending coronary artery.
She was discharged on postoperative day 22, at which time her ECG showed T-wave inversion in leads V3-4 and a LV ejection fraction of approximately 50%.
The demonstration of T-wave inversion after the SCD arrest may suggest the occurrence of a transient ischemic episode.
One of these is an anterior T-wave inversion. Although a minor change of the T-wave in an anterior lead can be a normal variant, larger changes (4-5 mm) can flag silent myocardial ischemia or infarction, intermittent LBBB, or ventricular overload.
The ischemic change was ST-segment depression in 13 patients, ST-segment elevation in 17 patients, T-wave inversion in 13 patients, and combined T-wave inversion and ST-segment deviation in 6 patients.
After resting for 7 min, Wenckebach second-degree atrioventricular block with anterolateral wall T-wave inversion was noted on the electrocardiogram.
ECG revealed an rSR' pattern with slight ST-segment elevation and T-wave inversion on the right precordial leads, indicating a Brugada-like ECG pattern (Figure 2(a)).