distribution

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distribution

 [dis″trĭ-bu´shun]
1. the specific location or arrangement of continuing or successive objects or events in space or time.
2. the extent of a ramifying structure such as an artery or nerve and its branches.
3. the geographical range of an organism or disease.
frequency distribution in statistics, a mathematical function that describes the distribution of measurements on a scale for a specific population.
normal distribution a symmetrical distribution of scores with the majority concentrated around the mean; for example, that representing a large number of independent random events. It is in the shape of a bell-shaped curve. Called also gaussian distribution. See illustration.
 Normal distribution. The approximate percentage of the area (or frequency) lying under the curve between standard deviations is indicated. From Dorland's, 2000.
probability distribution a mathematical function that assigns to each measurable event in a sample group the probability that the event will occur.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn),
1. The passage of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. The relative numbers of people in each of various categories or populations such as in different age, gender, or occupational samples.
4. Partition.
5. The pattern of occurrence of a substance within or between organelles, cells, tissues, organisms, or taxa.
[L. distribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]

distribution

(dĭs′trə-byo͞o′shən)
n.
1. The extension of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. The geographic occurrence or range of an organism.
4. A characterization of the occurrence of the actual unique values in a set of data (as in a frequency distribution) or of the theoretical unique values of a random variable (as in a probability distribution).

dis′tri·bu′tion·al adj.

distribution

Medspeak
The location or site of predilecton of a lesion or process.

Pharmacology
The reversible transfer of a drug from one site to another in the body.
 
Statistics
A group of ordered values; the frequencies or relative frequencies of all possible values of a characteristic.

distribution

Clinical medicine The pattern of involvement of a tissue by a particular condition. See Batwing distribution, Fat distribution, Mocassin distribution, Stocking & glove distribution Epidemiology The frequency and pattern of health-related characteristics and events in a population Pharmacology The location–eg intravascular or extravascular of a therapeutic agent after absorption, which corresponds to the sum of its distribution and elimination; disposition includes both the alpha and beta portions of a declining serum dose concentration versus time curve. See Disposition, Elimination.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn)
1. The passage of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. Passage of an agent through blood or lymph to body sites remote from the site(s) of contact and absorption; thus called systemic distribution.
4. The relative numbers of people in each of various categories or populations, such as in different age, sex, or occupational samples.
5. The pattern of occurrence of a substance within or between cells, tissues, organisms, or taxa.
[L. dis-tribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]

distribution

the occurrence of a species over the total area in which it occurs, i.e. its range or geographical distribution. In aquatic organisms or soil organisms, or even organisms living on mountains, vertical distribution is also important. In some organisms vertical distribution may vary seasonally, as does geographical distribution, particularly in migratory forms. See also FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION, DISPERSION.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn)
1. Passage of branches of arteries or nerves to tissues and organs.
2. Area in which branches of an artery or a nerve terminate or area supplied by such artery or nerve.
[L. dis-tribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]
References in periodicals archive ?
From the t-distribution with df = 9, we obtain the p-value of 0.01, which shows strong evidence to reject the null hypothesis.
As is seen there, the agreement between the true bivariate t-distribution and the Gaussian mapping is striking.
We estimated the parameters of the univariate generalized hyperbolic, hyperbolic, variance gamma, normal inverse Gaussian, and skew Student's t-distributions for the z-scored daily log-returns of liquid mining stocks listed on the Johannesburg Stocks Exchange from January 2006 to December 2011.
Similar to the t-distribution case, the coverage probability of the 99% confidence intervals is almost exact, while the coverage probabilities of the 90% and 95% confidence intervals are almost exact for the case in which [[theta].sub.0] = 0.2 but off by about 1% to 2% for the case in which [[theta].sub.0] = 0.4.
The first step of this test is to specify the prior odds of a model having a heavier tailed error distribution (i.e., a t-distribution with v being less than 30 degrees of freedom) versus a model that assumes approximately normality of the errors (v greater than or equal to 30) to be equal to 1; this holds given prior specification (1) for v.
We also wish to thank an anonymous referee for pointing out that the noncentral t-distribution can be straightforwardly simulated if software for the [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] function is unavailable.
The distribution of [t.sup.*], which is a Welch-type statistic (18), is approximated by the noncentral t-distribution (18-21) with estimated noncentrality parameter:
Predictive Stop-Loss Premiums and Student's t-Distribution. Insurance, Mathematics & Economics 16(2): 151-159.
Model 7 has the same variance dynamics as the true model, but instead of using the normal distribution, it uses the t-distribution with six degrees of freedom.
In a 1984 experiment, Hutchinson and Rose (1991) found that O mean longevity was greater than B mean longevity [B: 50.08 ([+ or -] 2.71) d; O: 62.52 ([+ or -] 2.69) d; P [less than] 0.05 two-tailed probability estimated using the t-distribution with N - 2 = 8 df].
A sorting of highest to lowest scores for each primary care group is constructed using a standardized distribution for the composite variables (Fisher's Z-distribution) and then transforming them to a T-distribution with a mean of 70 and a standard deviation of 10.
The upper bound of p(d) in (14) takes the form [mathematical expression not reproducible], for 0 < r < 0.5, m = (1/2)(ln([[theta].sub.01]/[k.sub.1]) - [l.sub.1])/ ([[sigma].sub.1]/[square root of (n)]), where [PSI](x) is a cdf of t-distribution function with ([n.sub.1] - 1) degrees of freedom and [PHI](x) is a cdf of the standard normal distribution.