T-cell

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Related to T-cells: Cytokines, B-cells

T-cell

or

helper T-cell

a type of LYMPHOCYTE produced in bone marrow and differentiating in thymus tissue, that counteracts the presence of foreign ANTIGENS by a process of cell-mediated immunity in which the antigen is slowly destroyed by the T-cell or by a toxin released from the T-cells. The ‘priming’ of the T-cell to a specific antigen and the long-term growth of activated T-cells is thought to be influenced by INTERLEUKINS produced by MACROPHAGES.
References in periodicals archive ?
The technical knowledge in these patents could, for example, help users engineer allogeneic CAR T-cells while suppressing genes involved in checkpoint inhibitions, such as PD-1, engineer drug resistance, or remove MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) related genes.
sup][3],[4] CD8[sup]+ T-cells are activated through their T-cell receptor (TCR) followed by secreting cytokines and functioning as effector cells.
Now, using Diamond Light Source, the UK's synchrotron science facility to shine intense super powerful X-rays into samples, a team from Cardiff University's Systems Immunity Research Institute found the same killer T-cells that cause type 1 diabetes are strongly activated by some bacteria.
Some of these memory T-cells will persist through the entire life of the organism .
Cancer is not recognised by the body's natural defence systems so T-cells are assigned the task of fighting it.
To overcome this, scientists have been using an enhanced, modified T-cell receptor (TCR) - a molecule on the surface of T-cells that acts like highly-sensitive fingertips that probe the body for signs of disease.
Memory T-cells measure the strength of an individual's immune system as they function to "remember" pathogens' signatures to create references in case another attack occurs from the same infection.
Researchers then edited the DNA inside the T-cells to give them the shielding mutation - known as CCR5-delta-32.
The genetic manipulation of autologous T-cells is a new frontier in oncology, one that shows early promise in emerging clinical trials," said Tom Daniel, president, research and early development at Celgene.
The researchers described the use of T-cells that were taken from a donor, programmed in the lab to recognize the Wilm's Tumor Antigen 1 (WT1) and kill leukemia cells, grown in large numbers, and then infused into patients to promote anti-leukemic activity.
T-cells (which mature in the thymus gland, hence, the "T") are in the forefront of our body's immune defenses, present in both blood and tissue, and unique to each person.
A team from Cardiff University and Kings College London has provided the first evidence of these killer T-cells in action.