CDH13

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CDH13

A gene on chromosome 16q23.3 that encodes a cadherin which lacks the cytoplasmic domain characteristic of other cadherins, and thus is not thought to be a cell–cell adhesion glycoprotein. CDH13 downregulates axon growth during neural differentiation, protects vascular endothelial cells from apoptosis due to oxidative stress, and is associated with resistance to atherosclerosis.

Molecular pathology
CDH13 is hypermethylated in many cancers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers discovered that endothelial cells secrete nitric oxide, while smooth muscle cells use the protein T-cadherin to interact with the neural crest, specialized embryonic cells that give rise to portions of the nervous system and other organs.
The combination of endothelial cell nitric oxide and the T-cadherin interaction is sufficient to coax neural crest cells into becoming autonomic neurons, where they can then co-align with developing blood vessels.
Ranscht and colleagues engineered mice that lacked T-cadherin and looked at their hearts.
They also found that without the ability to bind adiponectin to the heart, mice with mutant T-cadherin suffered from increased cardiac damage and experienced the same symptoms as mice lacking adiponectin under those conditions.
If T-cadherin were necessary for mediating adiponectin-induced cardioprotection, then a rescue by administering adiponectin to adiponectin-deficient mice should not work in T-cadherin-deficient mice.
Indeed, adding adiponectin to the double mutant mice did not rescue the stress-damaged hearts, underscoring the importance of T-cadherin for adiponectin functions in the heart.