T-cell receptor

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T-cell re·cep·tor

(TCR) (sel rĕ-sep'tŏr)
An adhesion molecule on the membrane of T lymphocytes, which serves as the receptor for antigen bound to antigen-presenting cells (APC) through MHC molecules. It is expressed in a complex with CD3. It is in proximity to the MHC-restricted receptor (CD4 or CD8).
Synonym(s): T-lymphocyte antigen receptor.

T-cell receptor

Abbreviation: TCR
One of two polypeptide chains (a or ß) on the surface of T lymphocytes that recognize and bind foreign antigens. TCRs are antigen specific; their activity depends on antigen processing by macrophages or other antigen-presenting cells and the presence of major histocompatibility complex proteins to which peptides from the antigen are bound.
See: autoimmunity; immune response; T cell
See also: receptor
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, they don't make typical antibodies or T cell receptors.
Over time, this fragment endowed descendants of that ancient creature with the DNA-shuffling ability needed to create vast arrays of antibodies and T cell receptors.
Brenner of Harvard University and Leonard Chess of Columbia University in New York City presented research by their laboratories indicating that there is a second class of T cell receptors.