systemic sclerosis


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Related to systemic sclerosis: progressive systemic sclerosis, CREST syndrome

sclerosis

 [sklĕ-ro´sis]
an induration or hardening, especially of a part from inflammation, or in disease of the interstitial substance. The term is used chiefly for such a hardening of the nervous system due to hyperplasia of the connective tissue or for hardening of the blood vessels. Called also induration. adj., adj sclerot´ic.
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis see amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
arteriolar sclerosis arteriolosclerosis.
disseminated sclerosis multiple sclerosis.
familial centrolobar sclerosis a progressive familial form of leukoencephalopathy marked by nystagmus, ataxia, tremor, parkinsonian facies, dysarthria, and mental deterioration.
focal glomerular sclerosis focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.
glomerular sclerosis glomerulosclerosis.
hippocampal sclerosis loss of neurons in the region of the hippocampus, with gliosis; sometimes seen in epilepsy.
lateral sclerosis a form seated in the lateral columns of the spinal cord. It may be primary, with spastic paraplegia, rigidity of the limbs, and increase of the tendon reflexes but no sensory disturbances, or secondary to myelitis, with paraplegia and sensory disturbance.
medial calcific sclerosis (Mönckeberg's sclerosis) Mönckeberg's arteriosclerosis.
multiple sclerosis see multiple sclerosis.
systemic sclerosis systemic scleroderma.
tuberous sclerosis a congenital heredofamilial disease, transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, characterized principally by the presence of hamartomas of the brain (tubers), retina (phakomas), and viscera, mental retardation, seizures, and adenoma sebaceum, and often associated with other skin lesions.

sys·tem·ic scle·ro·sis

1. a systemic disease characterized by formation of hyalinized and thickened collagenous fibrous tissue, with thickening of the skin and adhesion to underlying tissues (especially of the hands and face), dysphagia due to loss of peristalsis and submucosal fibrosis of the esophagus, dyspnea due to pulmonary fibrosis, myocardial fibrosis, and renal vascular changes resembling those of malignant hypertension; Raynaud phenomenon, atrophy of the soft tissues, and osteoporosis of the distal phalanges (acrosclerosis), sometimes with gangrene at the ends of the digits, are common findings. The term progressive systemic sclerosis is commonly used and is appropriate for cases with initially widespread skin involvement including the trunk. However, when skin involvement is limited to the distal extremities and face, there is often prolonged delay in appearance of visceral manifestations.
See also: CREST syndrome.
2. Synonym(s): scleroderma

systemic sclerosis

a form of scleroderma characterized by formation of thickened collagenous fibrous tissue, thickening of the skin, and adhesion of the skin to underlying tissues. The disease, which may be preceded by Raynaud's phenomenon, progresses to involve the tissues of the heart, lungs, muscles, genitourinary tract, and kidneys. See also scleroderma.

systemic sclerosis

Scleroderma Rheumatology An idiopathic connective tissue disease with clinical and pathologic features of GVHD, characterized by subcutaneous and visceral fibrosis, anticentromere and antitopoisomerase antibodies and prominent microvascular changes with endothelial cell damage and proliferation of subendothelial connective tissue; ♀:♂ ratio, 3-8:1-after child-bearing yrs Peak Age 45 to 55. See Connective tissue disease, Graft-versus-host disease.

systemic sclerosis

A generalized CONNECTIVE TISSUE disorder featuring FIBROSIS and degeneration of the skin and the internal organs. There is severe RAYNAUD'S PHENOMENON, swelling of the fingers, pigmentation, shiny atrophy and tightening of the skin so that the face becomes mask-like and there is difficulty in opening the mouth. There is no effective treatment.

Systemic sclerosis

A rare disorder that causes thickening and scarring of multiple organ systems.
Mentioned in: Scleroderma

systemic sclerosis

autoimmune connective tissue disease characterized by vasculitis and progressive sclerosis of soft tissues; causes vasculitic lesions of skin, joints, gut and kidney, calcinosis, malabsorption, arthritis, scleroderma and reduced kidney function
References in periodicals archive ?
Because SSc-ILD and IPF share similarities in how the underlying lung scarring, or fibrosis, forms in people with the disease, we are evaluating the impact of nintedanib on lung fibrosis associated with systemic sclerosis," said Danny McBryan, M.
The fibrinolytic system components are increased in systemic sclerosis and modulated by Alprostadil (alpha1 ciclodestryn).
Coexistence of systemic sclerosis with other autoimmune diseases.
Pregnant women with systemic sclerosis "should be monitored often and carefully after delivery for not only renal but other life-threatening complications," Dr.
2) Four females with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), aged from 20--40 years with the criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, and polymyositis /dermatomyositis.
Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease that is highly heterogeneous and has multiple overlapping and poorly defined clinical subsets.
Scleroderma, or progressing systemic sclerosis, is a chronic disease that affects the skin, heart, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, and musculoskeletal system.
In systemic sclerosis the skin becomes hardened, shiny and tethered, leading to a small mouth with surrounding radial furrowing, claw-like deformity of the hands and a beak-like nose.
The entrance fee of pounds 50 per runner and other funds raised will go to the Lord Mayor's Charities which are the Kidney Disease SLE Research Fund at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, League of Friends of John Taylor Hospice, the West Midlands Lupus Group and the Systemic Sclerosis Charity at Selly Oak Hospital.
Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a life-threatening visceral complication of systemic sclerosis (SSc) characterized by the abrupt onset of malignant hypertension and rapidly progressive, oliguric renal failure.
Moreover, IMA concentrations correlated with disease severity in systemic sclerosis (4), and an exercise-induced decrease in IMA concentrations correlated with the ankle-brachial index in patients with peripheral artery sclerosis (5).